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President has hectic first day

By Choi Ha-young

President Moon Jae-in and first lady Kim Jung-sook walk into the main building at Cheong Wa Dae, Wednesday. / Yonhap
President Moon Jae-in and first lady Kim Jung-sook walk into the main building at Cheong Wa Dae, Wednesday. / Yonhap
After his victory was confirmed by the National Election Commission at 8:09 a.m., Wednesday, President Moon Jae-in has had little time to waste on his first day as the country's new president.

One minute after the announcement, Moon took control of the military forces and held a brief phone conversation with Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Lee Sun-jin.

Moon and first lady Kim Jung-sook left their home at 9:30 a.m., surrounded by some 500 residents of Hongeun-dong, western Seoul. The couple then went to the Seoul National Cemetery at 10:10 a.m. to pay their respects to those buried there.

Moon then visited the National Assembly and met with opposition leaders.

"I vow to share core intelligence information with opposition parties, and not just ask for your help," he told the Liberty Korea Party floor leader Rep. Chung Woo-taik. "This visit is not a one-off event. I will keep visiting you during the whole term."

During his meetings with members of the second-largest opposition People's Party, third-largest opposition Bareun Party and tiny progressive Justice Party, he emphasized cooperation with them, under a pleasant atmosphere.

The four parties, except for the LKP, have generally formed a consensus on hiking the minimum wage, expanding welfare, heavier taxation on corporations and those with high incomes, and placing more regulations on family-run conglomerates.

"The DPK and the People's Party are from the same foundation," Moon said. In response, former People's Party Chairman Park Jie-won, who had recently coined the term "Moon-morning" for his obsessive criticisms against Moon in daily news conferences, warmly welcomed him. "Good morning, instead of Moon-morning," the veteran politician jokingly said.

Moon's swearing-in ceremony at noon in the Assembly was very low-key, unlike that of former President Park with a 21-gun salute. He reiterated social integration across the region and among generations. "I hope to be a president for all Koreans. I also vow to serve for those who didn't support me," he said.

After the 25-minute event, he headed to the Cheong Wa Dae. On the way to the presidential palace, Moon confidently waved to citizens throughout the parade in an open car.

Moon again clarified his message of social integration through the personnel appointments announced during his first press conference at 2:30 p.m. The president nominated South Jeolla Governor Lee Nak-yon as prime minister, in an effort to recruit officials with diverse regional backgrounds. For decades, those born in the region have been excluded from top posts.

In line with his No. 1 pledge as a candidate, Moon's first order as president was the setting up of a committee on job creation, at 3:30 p.m. The president will lead the committee, while the prime minister will serve as the vice chief.

To deal with urgent diplomatic problems with neighboring countries, he is likely to have talks on the phone with foreign leaders.

The White House press secretary Sean Spicer implied that United States President Donald Trump's will talk with Moon in the near future. "The president looks forward to meeting with him and talking about shared interests," Spicer said Tuesday (local time), asked about a controversial missile defense system.

Chinese leader Xi Jinping congratulated Moon on winning the election, Wednesday, the nation's news agency Xinhua reported.

Before the presidential residence is refurbished, Moon will stay at his private home for few days and then move to Cheong Wa Dae. As he pledged earlier, he is likely to settle down around Gwanghwamun, central square of Seoul, in the near future for frequent communication with citizens.

By Choi Ha-young

President Moon Jae-in and first lady Kim Jung-sook walk into the main building at Cheong Wa Dae, Wednesday. / Yonhap
President Moon Jae-in and first lady Kim Jung-sook walk into the main building at Cheong Wa Dae, Wednesday. / Yonhap
After his victory was confirmed by the National Election Commission at 8:09 a.m., Wednesday, President Moon Jae-in has had little time to waste on his first day as the country's new president.

One minute after the announcement, Moon took control of the military forces and held a brief phone conversation with Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Lee Sun-jin.

Moon and first lady Kim Jung-sook left their home at 9:30 a.m., surrounded by some 500 residents of Hongeun-dong, western Seoul. The couple then went to the Seoul National Cemetery at 10:10 a.m. to pay their respects to those buried there.

Moon then visited the National Assembly and met with opposition leaders.

"I vow to share core intelligence information with opposition parties, and not just ask for your help," he told the Liberty Korea Party floor leader Rep. Chung Woo-taik. "This visit is not a one-off event. I will keep visiting you during the whole term."

During his meetings with members of the second-largest opposition People's Party, third-largest opposition Bareun Party and tiny progressive Justice Party, he emphasized cooperation with them, under a pleasant atmosphere.

The four parties, except for the LKP, have generally formed a consensus on hiking the minimum wage, expanding welfare, heavier taxation on corporations and those with high incomes, and placing more regulations on family-run conglomerates.

"The DPK and the People's Party are from the same foundation," Moon said. In response, former People's Party Chairman Park Jie-won, who had recently coined the term "Moon-morning" for his obsessive criticisms against Moon in daily news conferences, warmly welcomed him. "Good morning, instead of Moon-morning," the veteran politician jokingly said.

Moon's swearing-in ceremony at noon in the Assembly was very low-key, unlike that of former President Park with a 21-gun salute. He reiterated social integration across the region and among generations. "I hope to be a president for all Koreans. I also vow to serve for those who didn't support me," he said.

After the 25-minute event, he headed to the Cheong Wa Dae. On the way to the presidential palace, Moon confidently waved to citizens throughout the parade in an open car.

Moon again clarified his message of social integration through the personnel appointments announced during his first press conference at 2:30 p.m. The president nominated South Jeolla Governor Lee Nak-yon as prime minister, in an effort to recruit officials with diverse regional backgrounds. For decades, those born in the region have been excluded from top posts.

In line with his No. 1 pledge as a candidate, Moon's first order as president was the setting up of a committee on job creation, at 3:30 p.m. The president will lead the committee, while the prime minister will serve as the vice chief.

To deal with urgent diplomatic problems with neighboring countries, he is likely to have talks on the phone with foreign leaders.

The White House press secretary Sean Spicer implied that United States President Donald Trump's will talk with Moon in the near future. "The president looks forward to meeting with him and talking about shared interests," Spicer said Tuesday (local time), asked about a controversial missile defense system.

Chinese leader Xi Jinping congratulated Moon on winning the election, Wednesday, the nation's news agency Xinhua reported.

Before the presidential residence is refurbished, Moon will stay at his private home for few days and then move to Cheong Wa Dae. As he pledged earlier, he is likely to settle down around Gwanghwamun, central square of Seoul, in the near future for frequent communication with citizens.


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