Military aims to augment troops with IT

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Military aims to augment troops with IT

Cyber security command to be revamped with limited authority

By Lee Min-hyung

The military unveiled reforms Thursday to augment troops with new technology as a way to cope with declining personnel and enhance the military's combat prowess.

The move is aimed at creating a smarter military environment in order to map out advanced training strategies and improve efficiency, according to the Ministry of National Defense.

The ministry said it would widen its use of emerging technologies, such as virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR), to establish efficient virtual training to be used by all branches of the armed forces.

The two emerging technologies are the talk of the technology town here and abroad, as they can create simulations of real-world environments. For instance, the Navy is building a computerized virtual submarine training system that can recreate multiple combat scenarios so sailors do not have to conduct real world exercises.

"The VR-based training systems are expected to effectively create an actual wartime environment, thereby reducing accidents from actual hands-on training and cutting costs," an official said.

The move is part of the ministry's ongoing Defense Reform 2.0 drive in which the military is making drastic changes to its structure to root out outdated and corrupt military practices.

Cyber Security Command revamped

The reform drive, unveiled Thursday, also includes the reorganization of the Cyber Security Command (CSC).

The ministry said it would revamp the unit to enhance its expertise in cyber warfare strategies, unveiling 10 specific missions for this goal, among others redefining its role.

These include the prevention of the CSC from interfering in politics as it did in 2012.

At that time, the command came under public criticism for writing online comments in favor or then-presidential candidate Park Geun-hye.

"The reorganized unit will focus solely on mapping out military cyber strategies, and a relevant reshuffle will be carried out to fulfill this mission," the ministry said in a statement.

The decision comes at a time when the military is facing a strong public backlash over the drawing up of a plan last year to impose martial if the Constitutional Court had rejected the impeachment of the scandal-tainted former President Park.

In the wake of the controversy, President Moon Jae-in ordered the defense ministry to end all politically-related activities within the military.

In a statement, the CSC pledged to introduce new information and communication technologies to establish a more sophisticated organization that can respond rapidly to any online threats.

The new organization will generate tangible results no later than the end of this year by adapting itself to new technology trends, the ministry said.

It also pledged to tighten cyber security and impose stern punishment on those who leak internal security information.

"The cyber command will regain public trust and improve its core capability of defending the country by not interfering in political affairs and implementing new technology," the ministry official said.


Cyber security command to be revamped with limited authority

By Lee Min-hyung

The military unveiled reforms Thursday to augment troops with new technology as a way to cope with declining personnel and enhance the military's combat prowess.

The move is aimed at creating a smarter military environment in order to map out advanced training strategies and improve efficiency, according to the Ministry of National Defense.

The ministry said it would widen its use of emerging technologies, such as virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR), to establish efficient virtual training to be used by all branches of the armed forces.

The two emerging technologies are the talk of the technology town here and abroad, as they can create simulations of real-world environments. For instance, the Navy is building a computerized virtual submarine training system that can recreate multiple combat scenarios so sailors do not have to conduct real world exercises.

"The VR-based training systems are expected to effectively create an actual wartime environment, thereby reducing accidents from actual hands-on training and cutting costs," an official said.

The move is part of the ministry's ongoing Defense Reform 2.0 drive in which the military is making drastic changes to its structure to root out outdated and corrupt military practices.

Cyber Security Command revamped

The reform drive, unveiled Thursday, also includes the reorganization of the Cyber Security Command (CSC).

The ministry said it would revamp the unit to enhance its expertise in cyber warfare strategies, unveiling 10 specific missions for this goal, among others redefining its role.

These include the prevention of the CSC from interfering in politics as it did in 2012.

At that time, the command came under public criticism for writing online comments in favor or then-presidential candidate Park Geun-hye.

"The reorganized unit will focus solely on mapping out military cyber strategies, and a relevant reshuffle will be carried out to fulfill this mission," the ministry said in a statement.

The decision comes at a time when the military is facing a strong public backlash over the drawing up of a plan last year to impose martial if the Constitutional Court had rejected the impeachment of the scandal-tainted former President Park.

In the wake of the controversy, President Moon Jae-in ordered the defense ministry to end all politically-related activities within the military.

In a statement, the CSC pledged to introduce new information and communication technologies to establish a more sophisticated organization that can respond rapidly to any online threats.

The new organization will generate tangible results no later than the end of this year by adapting itself to new technology trends, the ministry said.

It also pledged to tighten cyber security and impose stern punishment on those who leak internal security information.

"The cyber command will regain public trust and improve its core capability of defending the country by not interfering in political affairs and implementing new technology," the ministry official said.


Lee Min-hyung mhlee@ktimes.com
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