China condemns Japanese man for vandalism of 'comfort woman' statue

Settings

ⓕ font-size

  • -2
  • -1
  • 0
  • +1
  • +2

China condemns Japanese man for vandalism of 'comfort woman' statue

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang / AP

By Jung Min-ho

The Chinese government has condemned a Japanese man for kicking a symbolic statue for the victims of Japan's wartime sexual slavery, also known as "comfort women."

Local media reported Tuesday that Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson Geng Shuang said China hopes Japan will take up its responsibility and handle the act of vandalism in Taipei properly.

CGTV, a Chinese state-run broadcaster, reported that Geng also said what Japanese soldiers did to the victims was inhumane and their crimes have been recognized by the international community.

The statement comes after Mitsuhiko Fujii, a Japanese right-wing group member, kicked the bronze statue in Tainan on Thursday.

His behavior caused dozens of human rights activists to rally outside Japan's de facto embassy in Taipei on Monday to call on the Japanese government to apologize.

As many as 200,000 Taiwanese, Koreans and many other Asian women were forced to work in Japan's wartime military brothels. In Taiwan, there are two publicly identified victims alive today.


Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang / AP

By Jung Min-ho

The Chinese government has condemned a Japanese man for kicking a symbolic statue for the victims of Japan's wartime sexual slavery, also known as "comfort women."

Local media reported Tuesday that Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson Geng Shuang said China hopes Japan will take up its responsibility and handle the act of vandalism in Taipei properly.

CGTV, a Chinese state-run broadcaster, reported that Geng also said what Japanese soldiers did to the victims was inhumane and their crimes have been recognized by the international community.

The statement comes after Mitsuhiko Fujii, a Japanese right-wing group member, kicked the bronze statue in Tainan on Thursday.

His behavior caused dozens of human rights activists to rally outside Japan's de facto embassy in Taipei on Monday to call on the Japanese government to apologize.

As many as 200,000 Taiwanese, Koreans and many other Asian women were forced to work in Japan's wartime military brothels. In Taiwan, there are two publicly identified victims alive today.


Jung Min-ho mj6c2@koreatimes.co.kr
LETTER

Sign up for eNewsletter