NASA's InSight landed on Mars

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NASA's InSight landed on Mars

A handout photo made available by NASA/JPL-Caltech on 11 December 2018 shows NASA InSight's first full selfie on Mars. It displays the lander's solar panels and deck. On top of the deck are its science instruments, weather sensor booms and UHF antenna. The selfie is made up of 11 images which were taken by its Instrument Deployment Camera, located on the elbow of its robotic arm. Those images are then stitched together into a mosaic. EPA
NASA engineers on the flight team, Kris Bruvold (L) and Sandy Krasner (R) celebrate the InSight spacecraft's successfull landing on the planet Mars from the Mission Support area in the Space Flight Operations facility at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California on November 26, 2018. Cheers and applause erupted at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory as a $993 million unmanned lander, called InSight, touched down on the Red Planet and managed to send back its first picture. AFP
An undated handout illustration made available by NASA shows a simulated view of NASA's InSight lander descending towards the surface of Mars on its parachute. EPA
The NASA Martian lander InSight dedicated to investigating the deep interior of Mars is seen in an undated artist's rendering. NASA on Wednesday said it would fix the InSight lander that was grounded in December due to a leak in its primary science instrument, putting the mission back on track for another launch attempt in 2018. Reuters
Revelers listen and watch as NASA's InSight spacecraft lands on Mars outside of the Nasdaq Marketplace in Times Square in New York City on November 26, 2018. UPI
Revelers listen and watch as NASA's InSight spacecraft lands on Mars outside of the Nasdaq Marketplace in Times Square in New York City on November 26, 2018. UPI
This image made available by NASA shows the planet Mars. This composite photo was created from over 100 images of Mars taken by Viking Orbiters in the 1970s. In our solar system family, Mars is Earth's next-of-kin, the next-door relative that has captivated humans for millennia. The attraction is sure to grow on Monday, Nov. 26 with the arrival of a NASA lander named InSight. AP
This image provided by NASA, assembled from a series of January 2018 photos made by the Mars Curiosity rover, shows an uphill view of Mount Sharp, which Curiosity had been climbing. In our solar system family, Mars is Earth's next-of-kin, the next-door relative that has captivated humans for millennia. The attraction is sure to grow on Monday, Nov. 26 with the arrival of a NASA lander named InSight. AP
People watch as the Mars InSight lander successfully touches down on the planet Mars and takes a picture of the surface of the Planet at a viewing party at the California Science Center in Los Angeles, California, USA, 26 November 2018. The retired Space Shuttle Endeavour is seen in the background. EPA
A life-size model of the spaceship Insight, NASA's first robotic lander dedicated to studying the deep interior of Mars, is shown at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, U.S. November 26, 2018. Reuters
Brian Clement, Planetary Protection lead for MarCO, talks about the Mars Cube One (MarCO) during an Mars InSight pre-landing briefing, on November 25, 2018 at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. AFP
Tim Priser, Quality Director, Lockheed Martin Space talks shows a small piece of the Mars InSight heat shield during a social media briefing, on November 25, 2018 at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. AFP
The MarCo, one of two CubeSats launched and following the InSight, marking the first time this kind of spacecraft has flown into deep space, is on display at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California on November 26, 2018 as excitement builds ahead of today's scheduled noontime (PST) landing of the spacecraft. AFP
This handout image released by NASA/JPL-Caltech on November 26, 2018 and acquired by NASA's InSight Mars lander using its robotic arm-mounted, Instrument Deployment Camera (IDC) shows a view from NASA's InSight lander after it touched down on the surface of Mars. AFP
An image acquired by NASA's InSight Mars lander using its robotic arm-mounted, Instrument Deployment Camera (IDC) is seen on Mars November 30, 2018. Image acquired November 30, 2018. Reuters
An image acquired by NASA's InSight Mars lander shows the area in front of the lander using its lander-mounted, Instrument Context Camera (ICC) on Mars November 30, 2018. Image acquired November 30, 2018. Reuters
This Friday, Dec. 7, 2018 photo made available by NASA shows a view from the arm-mounted camera on the InSight Mars lander. The spacecraft arrived on the planet on Nov. 26. AP
In this image obtained from NASA, InSight's robotic-arm mounted Instrument Deployment Camera shows the instruments on the spacecraft's deck, with the Martian surface of Elysium Planitia in the background. The color-calibrated picture was acquired on December 4, 2018 - Humans can now hear the haunting, low rumble of wind on Mars for the first time, after NASA's InSight lander captured vibrations from the breeze on the Red Planet, the US space agency said on December 7, 2018. The strong gusts of wind, blowing between 10 to 15 mph (five to seven meters a second), were captured as they moved over the solar panels on InSight, an unmanned lander that touched down on Earth's dusty, desolate neighbor November 26. AFP
A handout photo made available by NASA/JPL-Caltech on 11 December 2018 shows NASA InSight's first full selfie on Mars. It displays the lander's solar panels and deck. On top of the deck are its science instruments, weather sensor booms and UHF antenna. The selfie is made up of 11 images which were taken by its Instrument Deployment Camera, located on the elbow of its robotic arm. Those images are then stitched together into a mosaic. EPA
NASA engineers on the flight team, Kris Bruvold (L) and Sandy Krasner (R) celebrate the InSight spacecraft's successfull landing on the planet Mars from the Mission Support area in the Space Flight Operations facility at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California on November 26, 2018. Cheers and applause erupted at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory as a $993 million unmanned lander, called InSight, touched down on the Red Planet and managed to send back its first picture. AFP
An undated handout illustration made available by NASA shows a simulated view of NASA's InSight lander descending towards the surface of Mars on its parachute. EPA
The NASA Martian lander InSight dedicated to investigating the deep interior of Mars is seen in an undated artist's rendering. NASA on Wednesday said it would fix the InSight lander that was grounded in December due to a leak in its primary science instrument, putting the mission back on track for another launch attempt in 2018. Reuters
Revelers listen and watch as NASA's InSight spacecraft lands on Mars outside of the Nasdaq Marketplace in Times Square in New York City on November 26, 2018. UPI
Revelers listen and watch as NASA's InSight spacecraft lands on Mars outside of the Nasdaq Marketplace in Times Square in New York City on November 26, 2018. UPI
This image made available by NASA shows the planet Mars. This composite photo was created from over 100 images of Mars taken by Viking Orbiters in the 1970s. In our solar system family, Mars is Earth's next-of-kin, the next-door relative that has captivated humans for millennia. The attraction is sure to grow on Monday, Nov. 26 with the arrival of a NASA lander named InSight. AP
This image provided by NASA, assembled from a series of January 2018 photos made by the Mars Curiosity rover, shows an uphill view of Mount Sharp, which Curiosity had been climbing. In our solar system family, Mars is Earth's next-of-kin, the next-door relative that has captivated humans for millennia. The attraction is sure to grow on Monday, Nov. 26 with the arrival of a NASA lander named InSight. AP
People watch as the Mars InSight lander successfully touches down on the planet Mars and takes a picture of the surface of the Planet at a viewing party at the California Science Center in Los Angeles, California, USA, 26 November 2018. The retired Space Shuttle Endeavour is seen in the background. EPA
A life-size model of the spaceship Insight, NASA's first robotic lander dedicated to studying the deep interior of Mars, is shown at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, U.S. November 26, 2018. Reuters
Brian Clement, Planetary Protection lead for MarCO, talks about the Mars Cube One (MarCO) during an Mars InSight pre-landing briefing, on November 25, 2018 at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. AFP
Tim Priser, Quality Director, Lockheed Martin Space talks shows a small piece of the Mars InSight heat shield during a social media briefing, on November 25, 2018 at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. AFP
The MarCo, one of two CubeSats launched and following the InSight, marking the first time this kind of spacecraft has flown into deep space, is on display at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California on November 26, 2018 as excitement builds ahead of today's scheduled noontime (PST) landing of the spacecraft. AFP
This handout image released by NASA/JPL-Caltech on November 26, 2018 and acquired by NASA's InSight Mars lander using its robotic arm-mounted, Instrument Deployment Camera (IDC) shows a view from NASA's InSight lander after it touched down on the surface of Mars. AFP
An image acquired by NASA's InSight Mars lander using its robotic arm-mounted, Instrument Deployment Camera (IDC) is seen on Mars November 30, 2018. Image acquired November 30, 2018. Reuters
An image acquired by NASA's InSight Mars lander shows the area in front of the lander using its lander-mounted, Instrument Context Camera (ICC) on Mars November 30, 2018. Image acquired November 30, 2018. Reuters
This Friday, Dec. 7, 2018 photo made available by NASA shows a view from the arm-mounted camera on the InSight Mars lander. The spacecraft arrived on the planet on Nov. 26. AP
In this image obtained from NASA, InSight's robotic-arm mounted Instrument Deployment Camera shows the instruments on the spacecraft's deck, with the Martian surface of Elysium Planitia in the background. The color-calibrated picture was acquired on December 4, 2018 - Humans can now hear the haunting, low rumble of wind on Mars for the first time, after NASA's InSight lander captured vibrations from the breeze on the Red Planet, the US space agency said on December 7, 2018. The strong gusts of wind, blowing between 10 to 15 mph (five to seven meters a second), were captured as they moved over the solar panels on InSight, an unmanned lander that touched down on Earth's dusty, desolate neighbor November 26. AFP

Choi Won-suk wschoi@koreatimes.co.kr
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