Inter-Korean railway link gets on track

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Inter-Korean railway link gets on track



South Korean officials have departed for a field study with North Korea to relink railways cut since the 1950-53 Korean conflict.


South Korean officials began their 18-day mission to re-link a divided peninsula on Friday (November 30). Around 30 officials - from each side - will be inspecting railways tracks cut since the Korean war.

It's the first step in an effort to reconnect rail and road links, between the two Koreas, part of an agreement reached between the leaders in April.

The train will travel around 1500 miles, including through the heavily fortified DMZ - a latest sign of detente between two countries technically still at war.

The project was given the green light by the UN Security Council last week - which granted exemptions to sanctions that are imposed on NorthKorea for its nuclear program, allowing the cross-border infrastructure project to go ahead.

Seoul has said that showed the U.S. and the international community are on board with the project. But Washington has been striking a more cautious tone than its South Korean ally.

In spite of plans for a second meeting between Kim Jong Un and President Trump.

The U.S. has insisted on keeping pressure on Pyongyang, until it gives up its nuclear arsenal - and has expressed concern that the North and South's budding relationship, might be outpacing progress toward full denuclearization. (Reuters)

A South Korean army soldier stands next to the train that will travel across the border into North Korea at the Dorasan Station in Paju, South Korea, Friday, Nov. 30, 2018. South Korea sent rail cars and dozens of officials to North Korea on Friday for joint surveys on northern railway sections the countries hope someday to connect with the South. AP


South Korean soldiers close the gate as the rails which leads to North Korea are seen inside the demilitarized zone separating the two Koreas in Paju, South Korea Friday, Nov. 30, 2018. South Korea sent rail cars and dozens of officials to North Korea on Friday for joint surveys on northern railway sections the countries hope someday to connect with the South. Reuters


A South Korean train transporting dozens of South Korean officials runs on the rails which leads to North Korea, inside the demilitarized zone separating the two Koreas in Paju, South Korea, November 30, 2018. Reuters




South Korean officials have departed for a field study with North Korea to relink railways cut since the 1950-53 Korean conflict.


South Korean officials began their 18-day mission to re-link a divided peninsula on Friday (November 30). Around 30 officials - from each side - will be inspecting railways tracks cut since the Korean war.

It's the first step in an effort to reconnect rail and road links, between the two Koreas, part of an agreement reached between the leaders in April.

The train will travel around 1500 miles, including through the heavily fortified DMZ - a latest sign of detente between two countries technically still at war.

The project was given the green light by the UN Security Council last week - which granted exemptions to sanctions that are imposed on NorthKorea for its nuclear program, allowing the cross-border infrastructure project to go ahead.

Seoul has said that showed the U.S. and the international community are on board with the project. But Washington has been striking a more cautious tone than its South Korean ally.

In spite of plans for a second meeting between Kim Jong Un and President Trump.

The U.S. has insisted on keeping pressure on Pyongyang, until it gives up its nuclear arsenal - and has expressed concern that the North and South's budding relationship, might be outpacing progress toward full denuclearization. (Reuters)

A South Korean army soldier stands next to the train that will travel across the border into North Korea at the Dorasan Station in Paju, South Korea, Friday, Nov. 30, 2018. South Korea sent rail cars and dozens of officials to North Korea on Friday for joint surveys on northern railway sections the countries hope someday to connect with the South. AP


South Korean soldiers close the gate as the rails which leads to North Korea are seen inside the demilitarized zone separating the two Koreas in Paju, South Korea Friday, Nov. 30, 2018. South Korea sent rail cars and dozens of officials to North Korea on Friday for joint surveys on northern railway sections the countries hope someday to connect with the South. Reuters


A South Korean train transporting dozens of South Korean officials runs on the rails which leads to North Korea, inside the demilitarized zone separating the two Koreas in Paju, South Korea, November 30, 2018. Reuters



Choi Won-suk wschoi@koreatimes.co.kr
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