'Remarkable' first image of black hole unveiled

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'Remarkable' first image of black hole unveiled



In a landmark breakthrough, scientists have revealed the first-ever photo of a black hole.


It's being described as a landmark breakthrough -- the first ever photo of a black hole.

FRANCE A. CORDOVA, NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION DIRECTOR, SAYING:

"Black holes have captivated the imaginations of scientists and the public for decades."

An international team of scientists used a global network of telescopes to capture the groundbreaking image in a distant galaxy, 54 million light-years from Earth.

SHEP DOELEMAN, DIRECTOR, SAYING:

"We are delighted to be able to report to you today that we have seen what we thought was unseeable."

Black holes are dense celestial entities with gravitational fields so strong no light or matter can escape, which makes viewing them extremely difficult.

Scientists combined the power of eight Earth-based telescopes from around the world to capture the picture.

A collaborative effort that's been eight years in the making.

The breakthrough image lends strong support to Einstein's theory of general relativity that explains the laws of gravity and their relation to other natural forces. (Reuters)






In a landmark breakthrough, scientists have revealed the first-ever photo of a black hole.


It's being described as a landmark breakthrough -- the first ever photo of a black hole.

FRANCE A. CORDOVA, NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION DIRECTOR, SAYING:

"Black holes have captivated the imaginations of scientists and the public for decades."

An international team of scientists used a global network of telescopes to capture the groundbreaking image in a distant galaxy, 54 million light-years from Earth.

SHEP DOELEMAN, DIRECTOR, SAYING:

"We are delighted to be able to report to you today that we have seen what we thought was unseeable."

Black holes are dense celestial entities with gravitational fields so strong no light or matter can escape, which makes viewing them extremely difficult.

Scientists combined the power of eight Earth-based telescopes from around the world to capture the picture.

A collaborative effort that's been eight years in the making.

The breakthrough image lends strong support to Einstein's theory of general relativity that explains the laws of gravity and their relation to other natural forces. (Reuters)




Choi Won-suk wschoi@koreatimes.co.kr


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