Sri Lanka in tears

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Sri Lanka in tears

Lightning strike in the sky over St. Anthony's Shrine in Colombo on April 25, 2019, as soldiers stand guard following a series of bomb blasts targeting churches and luxury hotels on the Easter Sunday in Sri Lanka. AFP
Blood stains are seen on a statue of Jesus Christ after a bomb blast inside a church in Negombo, Sri Lanka April 21, 2019. Reuters
Sri Lankan Special Task Force (STF) personnel gesture outside a house during a raid in the Orugodawatta area of the capital Colombo on April 21, 2019. AFP
Sri Lankans living near St. Anthony's shrine run for safety after police found explosive devices in parked vehicle, which later exploded in Colombo, Sri Lanka, Monday, April 22, 2019. Easter Sunday bombings that ripped through Sri Lanka's churches and luxury hotels killed more than 200 people. AP
A shoe of a victim is seen in front of the St. Anthony's Shrine, Kochchikade church after an explosion in Colombo, Sri Lanka April 21, 2019. Reuters
Anusha Kumari, second from left, weeps during a mass burial for her husband, two children and three siblings, all victims of Easter Sunday's bomb attacks, in Negombo, Sri Lanka, Wednesday, April 24, 2019. In an instant on Easter Sunday, Kumari, 43, was left childless and a widow when suicide bombers launched a coordinated attack on churches and luxury hotels in and just outside Sri Lanka's capital, Colombo. AP
A statue of St. James stands on a wall speckled with fragments of shrapnel at St. Sebastian's Church, where a suicide bomber blew himself up in Negombo, north of Colombo, Sri Lanka, Thursday, April 25, 2019. AP
Local residents gather outside the St. Anthony's Shrine in Colombo on April 22, 2019. AFP
Sri Lankan soldiers look on inside the St Sebastian's Church at Katuwapitiya in Negombo on April 21, 2019, following a bomb blast during the Easter service that killed tens of people. AFP
A Sri Lankan catholic priest stands near broken glass in front St. Anthony's Church in Colombo, Sri Lanka, Friday, April 26, 2019. Priests have allowed journalists inside St. Anthony's Church in Sri Lanka for the first time since it was targeted in a series of Islamic State-claimed suicide bombings that killed over 250 people. Broken glass littered the sanctuary's damaged pews and blood stained the floor. Shoes left by panicked worshippers remained in the darkened church, and broken bottles of holy water lay on the floor. AP
A man holds a cross during a mass burial of victims, two days after a string of suicide bomb attacks on churches and luxury hotels across the island on Easter Sunday, at a cemetery near St. Sebastian Church in Negombo, Sri Lanka April 23, 2019. Reuters
Melton Roy, prays amid the newly buried graves of Easter Sunday bomb blast victims at Methodist burial ground in Negombo, Sri Lanka, Tuesday, April 23, 2019. Roy thanked The God for protecting his family from harm and prayed for the life of the people who were affected. AP
Lalitha, center, weeps beside the coffin with the remains of 12-year old niece, Sneha Savindi, who was a victim of Easter Sunday bombing at St. Sebastian Church, after it returning home in Negombo, Sri Lanka, Monday, April 22, 2019. Easter Sunday bombings of churches, luxury hotels and other sites was Sri Lanka's deadliest violence since a devastating civil war in the South Asian island nation ended a decade ago. AP
Relatives bury three members of the same family, all died at Easter Sunday bomb blast at St. Sebastian Church in Negombo, Sri Lanka, Monday, April 22, 2019. AP
Mourners grieve at the burial of three members of the same family victims of Easter Sunday bomb blast at St. Sebastian Church in Negombo, Sri Lanka, Monday, April 22, 2019. AP
Anusha Kumari 43, wife of a St Sebastian's Church suicide blast victim Dulip Appuhami, 46, reacts as she cries in her house in Negombo on April 24, 2019. AFP
A statue of Virgin Marry broken in two parts is seen in front of the St. Anthony's Shrine, Kochchikade church after an explosion in Colombo, Sri Lanka April 21, 2019. Reuters
Catholic nuns stand with a relative of a victim of Easter Sunday's bomb blast at St. Sebastian Church at a mass burial site in Negombo, Sri Lanka Thursday, April 25, 2019. The U.S. Embassy in Sri Lanka warned Thursday that places of worship could be targeted for militant attacks over the coming weekend, as police searched for more suspects in the Islamic State-claimed Easter suicide bombings that killed over 250 people. AP
A Sri Lankan woman cries during a burial service for a bomb blast victim in a cemetery in Colombo on April 23, 2019. AFP
A relative of a victim of Easter bomb blasts wipes her tears during a prayer at the burial site of her relatives after a televised Sunday mass by Sri Lankan Archbishop Cardinal Malcolm Ranjith, in Negombo, north of Colombo, Sri Lanka, Sunday, April 28, 2019. Sri Lanka's Catholics celebrated Sunday Mass in their homes by a televised broadcast as churches across the island nation shut over fears of militant attacks, a week after the Islamic State-claimed Easter suicide bombings killed over 250 people. AP
A candle and fresh flowers are placed on the cemetery of a victim of Easter bomb blast, in Negombo, north of Colombo, Sri Lanka, Sunday, April 28, 2019. AP
A candle burns outside St. Anthony's Shrine a week after a string of suicide bomb attacks across the island on Easter Sunday, in Colombo, Sri Lanka April 28, 2019. Reuters
A view of St. Sebastian's Church damaged in blast in Negombo, north of Colombo, Sri Lanka, Sunday, April 21, 2019. AP


A Sri Lankan Muslim man prays at the Dawatagaha Jumma Masjid mosque during Friday noon prayers in Colombo on April 26, 2019.
A Sri Lankan Christian devotees prays at a barricade near St. Anthony's Shrine in Colombo on April 28, 2019, a week after a series of bomb blasts targeting churches and luxury hotels on Easter Sunday in Sri Lanka. AFP
A man holds a candle during a vigil to show solidarity with the victims of Sri Lanka's serial bomb blasts, inside a college in Kolkata, India, April 26, 2019. Reuters
A Sri Lankan Muslim boy looks out from the window of a Mosque before the Friday prayers in Colombo, Sri Lanka, Friday, April 26, 2019. Across Colombo, there was a visible increase of security as authorities warned of another attack and pursued suspects that could have access to explosives. Authorities had told Muslims to pray at home rather than attend communal Friday prayers that are the most important religious service for the faithful. At one mosque in Colombo where prayers were still held, police armed with Kalashnikov assault rifles stood guard outside. AP
Sri Lankan Army soldiers lower the national flag as the sun sets on Sunday, in Colombo, Sri Lanka, April 28, 2019. In a rare show of unity, Sri LankanPresident Maithripala Sirisena, Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe and opposition leader Mahinda Rajapaksa attended the Sunday Mass in person. Their political rivalry and government dysfunction are blamed for a failure to act upon near-specific information received from foreign intelligence agencies that preceded the bombings, which targeted three churches and three luxury hotels. AP
Lightning strike in the sky over St. Anthony's Shrine in Colombo on April 25, 2019, as soldiers stand guard following a series of bomb blasts targeting churches and luxury hotels on the Easter Sunday in Sri Lanka. AFP
Blood stains are seen on a statue of Jesus Christ after a bomb blast inside a church in Negombo, Sri Lanka April 21, 2019. Reuters
Sri Lankan Special Task Force (STF) personnel gesture outside a house during a raid in the Orugodawatta area of the capital Colombo on April 21, 2019. AFP
Sri Lankans living near St. Anthony's shrine run for safety after police found explosive devices in parked vehicle, which later exploded in Colombo, Sri Lanka, Monday, April 22, 2019. Easter Sunday bombings that ripped through Sri Lanka's churches and luxury hotels killed more than 200 people. AP
A shoe of a victim is seen in front of the St. Anthony's Shrine, Kochchikade church after an explosion in Colombo, Sri Lanka April 21, 2019. Reuters
Anusha Kumari, second from left, weeps during a mass burial for her husband, two children and three siblings, all victims of Easter Sunday's bomb attacks, in Negombo, Sri Lanka, Wednesday, April 24, 2019. In an instant on Easter Sunday, Kumari, 43, was left childless and a widow when suicide bombers launched a coordinated attack on churches and luxury hotels in and just outside Sri Lanka's capital, Colombo. AP
A statue of St. James stands on a wall speckled with fragments of shrapnel at St. Sebastian's Church, where a suicide bomber blew himself up in Negombo, north of Colombo, Sri Lanka, Thursday, April 25, 2019. AP
Local residents gather outside the St. Anthony's Shrine in Colombo on April 22, 2019. AFP
Sri Lankan soldiers look on inside the St Sebastian's Church at Katuwapitiya in Negombo on April 21, 2019, following a bomb blast during the Easter service that killed tens of people. AFP
A Sri Lankan catholic priest stands near broken glass in front St. Anthony's Church in Colombo, Sri Lanka, Friday, April 26, 2019. Priests have allowed journalists inside St. Anthony's Church in Sri Lanka for the first time since it was targeted in a series of Islamic State-claimed suicide bombings that killed over 250 people. Broken glass littered the sanctuary's damaged pews and blood stained the floor. Shoes left by panicked worshippers remained in the darkened church, and broken bottles of holy water lay on the floor. AP
A man holds a cross during a mass burial of victims, two days after a string of suicide bomb attacks on churches and luxury hotels across the island on Easter Sunday, at a cemetery near St. Sebastian Church in Negombo, Sri Lanka April 23, 2019. Reuters
Melton Roy, prays amid the newly buried graves of Easter Sunday bomb blast victims at Methodist burial ground in Negombo, Sri Lanka, Tuesday, April 23, 2019. Roy thanked The God for protecting his family from harm and prayed for the life of the people who were affected. AP
Lalitha, center, weeps beside the coffin with the remains of 12-year old niece, Sneha Savindi, who was a victim of Easter Sunday bombing at St. Sebastian Church, after it returning home in Negombo, Sri Lanka, Monday, April 22, 2019. Easter Sunday bombings of churches, luxury hotels and other sites was Sri Lanka's deadliest violence since a devastating civil war in the South Asian island nation ended a decade ago. AP
Relatives bury three members of the same family, all died at Easter Sunday bomb blast at St. Sebastian Church in Negombo, Sri Lanka, Monday, April 22, 2019. AP
Mourners grieve at the burial of three members of the same family victims of Easter Sunday bomb blast at St. Sebastian Church in Negombo, Sri Lanka, Monday, April 22, 2019. AP
Anusha Kumari 43, wife of a St Sebastian's Church suicide blast victim Dulip Appuhami, 46, reacts as she cries in her house in Negombo on April 24, 2019. AFP
A statue of Virgin Marry broken in two parts is seen in front of the St. Anthony's Shrine, Kochchikade church after an explosion in Colombo, Sri Lanka April 21, 2019. Reuters
Catholic nuns stand with a relative of a victim of Easter Sunday's bomb blast at St. Sebastian Church at a mass burial site in Negombo, Sri Lanka Thursday, April 25, 2019. The U.S. Embassy in Sri Lanka warned Thursday that places of worship could be targeted for militant attacks over the coming weekend, as police searched for more suspects in the Islamic State-claimed Easter suicide bombings that killed over 250 people. AP
A Sri Lankan woman cries during a burial service for a bomb blast victim in a cemetery in Colombo on April 23, 2019. AFP
A relative of a victim of Easter bomb blasts wipes her tears during a prayer at the burial site of her relatives after a televised Sunday mass by Sri Lankan Archbishop Cardinal Malcolm Ranjith, in Negombo, north of Colombo, Sri Lanka, Sunday, April 28, 2019. Sri Lanka's Catholics celebrated Sunday Mass in their homes by a televised broadcast as churches across the island nation shut over fears of militant attacks, a week after the Islamic State-claimed Easter suicide bombings killed over 250 people. AP
A candle and fresh flowers are placed on the cemetery of a victim of Easter bomb blast, in Negombo, north of Colombo, Sri Lanka, Sunday, April 28, 2019. AP
A candle burns outside St. Anthony's Shrine a week after a string of suicide bomb attacks across the island on Easter Sunday, in Colombo, Sri Lanka April 28, 2019. Reuters
A view of St. Sebastian's Church damaged in blast in Negombo, north of Colombo, Sri Lanka, Sunday, April 21, 2019. AP


A Sri Lankan Muslim man prays at the Dawatagaha Jumma Masjid mosque during Friday noon prayers in Colombo on April 26, 2019.
A Sri Lankan Christian devotees prays at a barricade near St. Anthony's Shrine in Colombo on April 28, 2019, a week after a series of bomb blasts targeting churches and luxury hotels on Easter Sunday in Sri Lanka. AFP
A man holds a candle during a vigil to show solidarity with the victims of Sri Lanka's serial bomb blasts, inside a college in Kolkata, India, April 26, 2019. Reuters
A Sri Lankan Muslim boy looks out from the window of a Mosque before the Friday prayers in Colombo, Sri Lanka, Friday, April 26, 2019. Across Colombo, there was a visible increase of security as authorities warned of another attack and pursued suspects that could have access to explosives. Authorities had told Muslims to pray at home rather than attend communal Friday prayers that are the most important religious service for the faithful. At one mosque in Colombo where prayers were still held, police armed with Kalashnikov assault rifles stood guard outside. AP
Sri Lankan Army soldiers lower the national flag as the sun sets on Sunday, in Colombo, Sri Lanka, April 28, 2019. In a rare show of unity, Sri LankanPresident Maithripala Sirisena, Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe and opposition leader Mahinda Rajapaksa attended the Sunday Mass in person. Their political rivalry and government dysfunction are blamed for a failure to act upon near-specific information received from foreign intelligence agencies that preceded the bombings, which targeted three churches and three luxury hotels. AP
Shim Hyun-chul shim@koreatimes.co.kr


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