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Amazon is in danger

This file picture taken on May 29, 2019 shows an aerial view of an agriculture field next to a native Cerrado (savanna) in Formosa do Rio Preto, western Bahia State, Brazil. - Faced with growing pressure in 2020 for Brazil to put a stop to deforestation in the Amazon, the agri-food giants are increasing the checks on the origin of their products and say they are calling on the Bolsonaro government to enforce environmental legislation. The recent case of Brazilian meat giant JBS, the world's number 1 meat producer, accused in July 2020 by a consortium of investigative media of having illicitly sourcing cattle from ranches blacklisted for destroying the Amazon, has reinforced this pressure. AFP
This file picture taken on May 29, 2019 shows an aerial view of an agriculture field next to a native Cerrado (savanna) in Formosa do Rio Preto, western Bahia State, Brazil. - Faced with growing pressure in 2020 for Brazil to put a stop to deforestation in the Amazon, the agri-food giants are increasing the checks on the origin of their products and say they are calling on the Bolsonaro government to enforce environmental legislation. The recent case of Brazilian meat giant JBS, the world's number 1 meat producer, accused in July 2020 by a consortium of investigative media of having illicitly sourcing cattle from ranches blacklisted for destroying the Amazon, has reinforced this pressure. AFP
This file picture takes on December 17, 2014 shows an aerial view of cattle in an agriculture field in Sao Paulo State, Brazil. AFP
This file picture takes on December 17, 2014 shows an aerial view of cattle in an agriculture field in Sao Paulo State, Brazil. AFP
This file picture taken on May 29, 2019 shows an aerial view of an agriculture field next to a native Cerrado (savanna) in Formosa do Rio Preto, western Bahia State, Brazil. AFP
This file picture taken on May 29, 2019 shows an aerial view of an agriculture field next to a native Cerrado (savanna) in Formosa do Rio Preto, western Bahia State, Brazil. AFP
Aerial view of the Coca River and a large erosive event around it, in Reventador, Sucumbios, Ecuador, 24 July 2020 (issued 18 August 2020). The channel of the Coca River has been making its way through the mountains to the northwest of the Ecuadorian Amazon in a phenomenon that scientists call headward erosion. EPA
Aerial view of the Coca River and a large erosive event around it, in Reventador, Sucumbios, Ecuador, 24 July 2020 (issued 18 August 2020). The channel of the Coca River has been making its way through the mountains to the northwest of the Ecuadorian Amazon in a phenomenon that scientists call headward erosion. EPA
 Members of the Kayapo tribe block the middle of highway BR163 with a barricade during a protest on the outskirts of Novo Progresso in Para State, Brazil, on August 17, 2020 amid the COVID-19 novel coronavirus pandemic. - Indigenous protestors blocked a major Trans-Amazonian highway to protest against the lack of governmental support during the COVID-19 pandemic and illegal deforestation in and around their territories. AFP
Members of the Kayapo tribe block the middle of highway BR163 with a barricade during a protest on the outskirts of Novo Progresso in Para State, Brazil, on August 17, 2020 amid the COVID-19 novel coronavirus pandemic. - Indigenous protestors blocked a major Trans-Amazonian highway to protest against the lack of governmental support during the COVID-19 pandemic and illegal deforestation in and around their territories. AFP
Kayapo Indigenous members block a road with a banner that reads in Portuguese 'Defending the Amazon. Without listening to Indigenous people, there will be no concession and nor grain railway,' near Novo Progresso, Para state, Brazil, Monday, Aug. 17, 2020. AP
Kayapo Indigenous members block a road with a banner that reads in Portuguese 'Defending the Amazon. Without listening to Indigenous people, there will be no concession and nor grain railway,' near Novo Progresso, Para state, Brazil, Monday, Aug. 17, 2020. AP
 A member of the Kayapo indigenous tribe holds a request given by a judicial officer asking them  to clear the highway BR163 within 24 hours, during a protest in the outskirts of Novo Progresso in Para State, Brazil, on August 18, 2020 amid the COVID-19 novel coronavirus pandemic. AFP
A member of the Kayapo indigenous tribe holds a request given by a judicial officer asking them to clear the highway BR163 within 24 hours, during a protest in the outskirts of Novo Progresso in Para State, Brazil, on August 18, 2020 amid the COVID-19 novel coronavirus pandemic. AFP
 A member of the Kayapo tribe walks along the middle of blocked highway BR163 during a protest on the outskirts of Novo Progresso in Para State, Brazil, on August 17, 2020 amid the COVID-19 novel coronavirus pandemic. AFP
A member of the Kayapo tribe walks along the middle of blocked highway BR163 during a protest on the outskirts of Novo Progresso in Para State, Brazil, on August 17, 2020 amid the COVID-19 novel coronavirus pandemic. AFP
 A member of the Kayapo tribe walks along the middle of blocked highway BR163 during a protest on the outskirts of Novo Progresso in Para State, Brazil, on August 17, 2020 amid the COVID-19 novel coronavirus pandemic. AFP
A member of the Kayapo tribe walks along the middle of blocked highway BR163 during a protest on the outskirts of Novo Progresso in Para State, Brazil, on August 17, 2020 amid the COVID-19 novel coronavirus pandemic. AFP
Miraceli de Oliveira reacts as the fire approaches her house in an area of Amazon rainforest, near Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil August 16, 2020. Reuters
Miraceli de Oliveira reacts as the fire approaches her house in an area of Amazon rainforest, near Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil August 16, 2020. Reuters
A donkey stands tied up next to a burnt area of Amazon rainforest reserve, south of Novo Progresso in Para state, on August 16, 2020. AFP
A donkey stands tied up next to a burnt area of Amazon rainforest reserve, south of Novo Progresso in Para state, on August 16, 2020. AFP
 Rosalino de Oliveira throws water trying protect their house as the fire approaches in area of Amazon rainforest, near Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil August 16, 2020. Reuters
Rosalino de Oliveira throws water trying protect their house as the fire approaches in area of Amazon rainforest, near Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil August 16, 2020. Reuters
 A tract of the Amazon jungle is seen burning near Ouro Preto, Rondonia State, Brazil August 20, 2020. Reuters
A tract of the Amazon jungle is seen burning near Ouro Preto, Rondonia State, Brazil August 20, 2020. Reuters
A tract of the Amazon jungle is seen burning near Ouro Preto, Rondonia State, Brazil August 20, 2020. Reuters
A tract of the Amazon jungle is seen burning near Ouro Preto, Rondonia State, Brazil August 20, 2020. Reuters
A burned tract of the Amazon jungle is cleared by loggers and farmers near Mirante da Serra, Rondonia State, Brazil August 20, 2020. Reuters
A burned tract of the Amazon jungle is cleared by loggers and farmers near Mirante da Serra, Rondonia State, Brazil August 20, 2020. Reuters
Brazilian soldier puts out fires at the Nova Fronteira region in Novo Progresso, Brazil. In 2019, the forest around the town of Novo Progresso erupted into flames — the first major blazes in the Brazilian Amazon's dry season and spurred global outrage against the government's inability or unwillingness to protect the rainforest. AP
Brazilian soldier puts out fires at the Nova Fronteira region in Novo Progresso, Brazil. In 2019, the forest around the town of Novo Progresso erupted into flames — the first major blazes in the Brazilian Amazon's dry season and spurred global outrage against the government's inability or unwillingness to protect the rainforest. AP


This file picture taken on May 29, 2019 shows an aerial view of an agriculture field next to a native Cerrado (savanna) in Formosa do Rio Preto, western Bahia State, Brazil. - Faced with growing pressure in 2020 for Brazil to put a stop to deforestation in the Amazon, the agri-food giants are increasing the checks on the origin of their products and say they are calling on the Bolsonaro government to enforce environmental legislation. The recent case of Brazilian meat giant JBS, the world's number 1 meat producer, accused in July 2020 by a consortium of investigative media of having illicitly sourcing cattle from ranches blacklisted for destroying the Amazon, has reinforced this pressure. AFP
This file picture taken on May 29, 2019 shows an aerial view of an agriculture field next to a native Cerrado (savanna) in Formosa do Rio Preto, western Bahia State, Brazil. - Faced with growing pressure in 2020 for Brazil to put a stop to deforestation in the Amazon, the agri-food giants are increasing the checks on the origin of their products and say they are calling on the Bolsonaro government to enforce environmental legislation. The recent case of Brazilian meat giant JBS, the world's number 1 meat producer, accused in July 2020 by a consortium of investigative media of having illicitly sourcing cattle from ranches blacklisted for destroying the Amazon, has reinforced this pressure. AFP
This file picture takes on December 17, 2014 shows an aerial view of cattle in an agriculture field in Sao Paulo State, Brazil. AFP
This file picture takes on December 17, 2014 shows an aerial view of cattle in an agriculture field in Sao Paulo State, Brazil. AFP
This file picture taken on May 29, 2019 shows an aerial view of an agriculture field next to a native Cerrado (savanna) in Formosa do Rio Preto, western Bahia State, Brazil. AFP
This file picture taken on May 29, 2019 shows an aerial view of an agriculture field next to a native Cerrado (savanna) in Formosa do Rio Preto, western Bahia State, Brazil. AFP
Aerial view of the Coca River and a large erosive event around it, in Reventador, Sucumbios, Ecuador, 24 July 2020 (issued 18 August 2020). The channel of the Coca River has been making its way through the mountains to the northwest of the Ecuadorian Amazon in a phenomenon that scientists call headward erosion. EPA
Aerial view of the Coca River and a large erosive event around it, in Reventador, Sucumbios, Ecuador, 24 July 2020 (issued 18 August 2020). The channel of the Coca River has been making its way through the mountains to the northwest of the Ecuadorian Amazon in a phenomenon that scientists call headward erosion. EPA
 Members of the Kayapo tribe block the middle of highway BR163 with a barricade during a protest on the outskirts of Novo Progresso in Para State, Brazil, on August 17, 2020 amid the COVID-19 novel coronavirus pandemic. - Indigenous protestors blocked a major Trans-Amazonian highway to protest against the lack of governmental support during the COVID-19 pandemic and illegal deforestation in and around their territories. AFP
Members of the Kayapo tribe block the middle of highway BR163 with a barricade during a protest on the outskirts of Novo Progresso in Para State, Brazil, on August 17, 2020 amid the COVID-19 novel coronavirus pandemic. - Indigenous protestors blocked a major Trans-Amazonian highway to protest against the lack of governmental support during the COVID-19 pandemic and illegal deforestation in and around their territories. AFP
Kayapo Indigenous members block a road with a banner that reads in Portuguese 'Defending the Amazon. Without listening to Indigenous people, there will be no concession and nor grain railway,' near Novo Progresso, Para state, Brazil, Monday, Aug. 17, 2020. AP
Kayapo Indigenous members block a road with a banner that reads in Portuguese 'Defending the Amazon. Without listening to Indigenous people, there will be no concession and nor grain railway,' near Novo Progresso, Para state, Brazil, Monday, Aug. 17, 2020. AP
 A member of the Kayapo indigenous tribe holds a request given by a judicial officer asking them  to clear the highway BR163 within 24 hours, during a protest in the outskirts of Novo Progresso in Para State, Brazil, on August 18, 2020 amid the COVID-19 novel coronavirus pandemic. AFP
A member of the Kayapo indigenous tribe holds a request given by a judicial officer asking them to clear the highway BR163 within 24 hours, during a protest in the outskirts of Novo Progresso in Para State, Brazil, on August 18, 2020 amid the COVID-19 novel coronavirus pandemic. AFP
 A member of the Kayapo tribe walks along the middle of blocked highway BR163 during a protest on the outskirts of Novo Progresso in Para State, Brazil, on August 17, 2020 amid the COVID-19 novel coronavirus pandemic. AFP
A member of the Kayapo tribe walks along the middle of blocked highway BR163 during a protest on the outskirts of Novo Progresso in Para State, Brazil, on August 17, 2020 amid the COVID-19 novel coronavirus pandemic. AFP
 A member of the Kayapo tribe walks along the middle of blocked highway BR163 during a protest on the outskirts of Novo Progresso in Para State, Brazil, on August 17, 2020 amid the COVID-19 novel coronavirus pandemic. AFP
A member of the Kayapo tribe walks along the middle of blocked highway BR163 during a protest on the outskirts of Novo Progresso in Para State, Brazil, on August 17, 2020 amid the COVID-19 novel coronavirus pandemic. AFP
Miraceli de Oliveira reacts as the fire approaches her house in an area of Amazon rainforest, near Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil August 16, 2020. Reuters
Miraceli de Oliveira reacts as the fire approaches her house in an area of Amazon rainforest, near Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil August 16, 2020. Reuters
A donkey stands tied up next to a burnt area of Amazon rainforest reserve, south of Novo Progresso in Para state, on August 16, 2020. AFP
A donkey stands tied up next to a burnt area of Amazon rainforest reserve, south of Novo Progresso in Para state, on August 16, 2020. AFP
 Rosalino de Oliveira throws water trying protect their house as the fire approaches in area of Amazon rainforest, near Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil August 16, 2020. Reuters
Rosalino de Oliveira throws water trying protect their house as the fire approaches in area of Amazon rainforest, near Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil August 16, 2020. Reuters
 A tract of the Amazon jungle is seen burning near Ouro Preto, Rondonia State, Brazil August 20, 2020. Reuters
A tract of the Amazon jungle is seen burning near Ouro Preto, Rondonia State, Brazil August 20, 2020. Reuters
A tract of the Amazon jungle is seen burning near Ouro Preto, Rondonia State, Brazil August 20, 2020. Reuters
A tract of the Amazon jungle is seen burning near Ouro Preto, Rondonia State, Brazil August 20, 2020. Reuters
A burned tract of the Amazon jungle is cleared by loggers and farmers near Mirante da Serra, Rondonia State, Brazil August 20, 2020. Reuters
A burned tract of the Amazon jungle is cleared by loggers and farmers near Mirante da Serra, Rondonia State, Brazil August 20, 2020. Reuters
Brazilian soldier puts out fires at the Nova Fronteira region in Novo Progresso, Brazil. In 2019, the forest around the town of Novo Progresso erupted into flames — the first major blazes in the Brazilian Amazon's dry season and spurred global outrage against the government's inability or unwillingness to protect the rainforest. AP
Brazilian soldier puts out fires at the Nova Fronteira region in Novo Progresso, Brazil. In 2019, the forest around the town of Novo Progresso erupted into flames — the first major blazes in the Brazilian Amazon's dry season and spurred global outrage against the government's inability or unwillingness to protect the rainforest. AP


Choi Won-suk wschoi@koreatimes.co.kr


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