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Go player cheated using AI

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gettyimagesbank

By Park Ji-won

A 13-year-old professional Go player was suspended from competing for one year, Friday, after she admitted to using artificial intelligence (AI) to enhance her gameplay in an online Go competition.

The Korea Baduk Association took the punitive measure against Kim Eun-ji, a2-dan professional Go player who had been considered a genius in the Korean Go scene and the youngest professional player, for violating the rules as a professional Go player and on ethics which stipulate that a player cannot receive outside advice in official competitions.

This came after Kim admitted she was assisted by an AI during a Go competition of cyberORO, which was held on Sept. 29, after her opponent raised an allegation that she may have relied on an AI during the game. Kim won over Lee Yeong-ku, a 9-dan professional Go player and a member of the national Go team, which shocked many because it defied expectations.

Kim's mother said, "All I can say is sorry. I was not able to look around myself as I spent all my energy on childcare. I will reflect on myself after what happened." Kim earlier submitted a letter apologizing to her opponent and for her actions.

Mok Jin-suk, coach of the national Go team, also apologized, saying "I feel a huge responsibility over the AI cheating, as a coach who lead the national Go team and young Go players, for failing to properly foster those players. I apologize in front of Go fans."

Similar incidents have occurred in the field of Go since the development of AI technology. Earlier in July, a Go player was sentenced to one year in prison for using AI during an enlistment Go game in January.

The organization has come up with stricter rules for using AI. The steering committee of the Korea Baduk Association added a rule on punitive measures against those who use AI. Violators may get face suspensions of three years or even a permanent ban from competing. The organization can also take emergency measures to suspend a violator's participation in a game for 30 days due to related matters.


gettyimagesbank
gettyimagesbank

By Park Ji-won

A 13-year-old professional Go player was suspended from competing for one year, Friday, after she admitted to using artificial intelligence (AI) to enhance her gameplay in an online Go competition.

The Korea Baduk Association took the punitive measure against Kim Eun-ji, a2-dan professional Go player who had been considered a genius in the Korean Go scene and the youngest professional player, for violating the rules as a professional Go player and on ethics which stipulate that a player cannot receive outside advice in official competitions.

This came after Kim admitted she was assisted by an AI during a Go competition of cyberORO, which was held on Sept. 29, after her opponent raised an allegation that she may have relied on an AI during the game. Kim won over Lee Yeong-ku, a 9-dan professional Go player and a member of the national Go team, which shocked many because it defied expectations.

Kim's mother said, "All I can say is sorry. I was not able to look around myself as I spent all my energy on childcare. I will reflect on myself after what happened." Kim earlier submitted a letter apologizing to her opponent and for her actions.

Mok Jin-suk, coach of the national Go team, also apologized, saying "I feel a huge responsibility over the AI cheating, as a coach who lead the national Go team and young Go players, for failing to properly foster those players. I apologize in front of Go fans."

Similar incidents have occurred in the field of Go since the development of AI technology. Earlier in July, a Go player was sentenced to one year in prison for using AI during an enlistment Go game in January.

The organization has come up with stricter rules for using AI. The steering committee of the Korea Baduk Association added a rule on punitive measures against those who use AI. Violators may get face suspensions of three years or even a permanent ban from competing. The organization can also take emergency measures to suspend a violator's participation in a game for 30 days due to related matters.


Park Ji-won jwpark@koreatimes.co.kr

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