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Two 'manageable tasks' facing Samsung leader Lee Jae-yong

Two 'manageable tasks' facing Samsung leader Lee Jae-yong

Samsung leader Lee Jae-yong, also known as Jay Y. Lee in English, is already putting his grip on the entire conglomerate even without being named chairman. It's unknown whether the junior Lee will take up the chairman title. In terms of the title, at least, it doesn't appear to matter because Samsung Electronics Vice Chairman Lee has been quite successful in terms of both external and quality-driven corporate growth, striking some big overseas acquisitions and addressing key legal issues such as ...

Korea caught in verbal Cold War

Korea caught in verbal Cold War

Chinese President Xi Jinping's definition of the Korean War has prompted Washington to hit back, raising additional concerns that rivalry of two super powers is creating verbal and cyber versions of a new “Cold War” here. Xi called the Korean War a fight against “imperialist invaders” in a recent speech in Beijing to mark the 70th anniversary of China's entry into the war and glorified its participation.

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[ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL] Robust middle power diplomacy needed to tackle geopolitical coercion

[ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL] Robust middle power diplomacy needed to tackle geopolitical coercion

In the last 70 years since the 1950-53 Korean War, Korea has risen to become an economic powerhouse and a key diplomatic player in Northeast Asia. When asked about the biggest diplomatic challenge faced by Korea, experts contacted by The Korea Times underlined the escalating U.S.-China competition. “The next 70 years will no doubt be as difficult if not treacherous as the previous 70,” said Donald Kirk, a columnist and author on Korean Peninsula issues. “We have to expect the unexpected, including the constant threat of nuclear war. South Korea in the whirlpool of regional rivalries should maintain ties with the major players - China, the U.S. and Japan - while working to persuade North Korea to abandon the nuclear option and live in peace for the sake of both Koreas, North and South.”

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Korea's disappearing culture captured in photography

Korea's disappearing culture captured in photography

Han Jeong-sik's “The Highway Beside the Stable” is a collection of photo essays showing Korea in the incipient stages of urbanization and in transition between the pre-modern and modern eras. The black-and-white photography is the author's personal account of extinct or disappearing elements of culture and his memories entangled with them. With his camera in hand, the retired professor of photography zeroed in on lamps, “touring” realtors (called “ttutdabang” as they popped up for a few days at sites where large housing complexes were to be built, in order to attract clients, and then disappeared once housing contracts were signed), and a woman in hanbok smoking through a long and slender pipe.Han, 81, discusses Korea's toilet culture in the section showing his 1980 photo taken in Seongju County, North Gyeongsang Province.

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Korean banks still vulnerable to money laundering

Korean banks still vulnerable to money laundering

Korean banks lag far behind foreign commercial banks here in their efforts to prevent money laundering, despite the global trend of tightening regulatory standards.

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[ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL] Korea Times is part of my life, says avid reader

[ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL] Korea Times is part of my life, says avid reader

Lee Bock-hee has played a role as an honorary goodwill ambassador of The Korea Times unwittingly for the past decade. Lee, vice president of the non-profit group Seoul International Women's Association (SIWA), was once a “need-driven” reader of the newspaper in 1982 when she entered college. Like other college students of her time, she read it to improve her English.

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