Visa rules eased for foreign graduates - The Korea Times
The Korea Times

Settings

ⓕ font-size

  • -2
  • -1
  • 0
  • +1
  • +2

Visa rules eased for foreign graduates

By Jung Min-ho

The Ministry of Justice eased visa restrictions Tuesday for foreigners with a Korean college degree in an effort to keep more international talent in the country.

The policy change will enable foreigners who have earned bachelor's or higher degrees in Korea to get an E-7 (designated activities) visa, even if what they do in the workplace is unrelated to their major. Previously, that relevancy was required.

A GPA of at least 3.0, a national certificate and recommendations of professors are no longer required from foreigners to apply for a D-10 (job seeking) visa.

Also, the length of stay for D-10 visa holders has been extended from one to two years.

Meanwhile, obtaining permanent residency in Korea has become easier.

Foreigners who received their bachelor's degree in science or engineering in Korea are now eligible to get permanent residency if they lived here for more than three years and their annual salary is higher than Korea's per capita gross national income (GNI). In 2013, that was $26,205.

Previously, the opportunity for permanent residency was limited to foreigners that studied one of only nine programs in college ― IT, technology management, nanotechnology, digital electronics, biotechnology, transport, new material, environment and energy.

Those who earned their master's or a higher degree in Korea are eligible to get permanent residency regardless of their majors, if they lived in Korea more than three years and their annual salary is higher than the GNI per capita.

The D-9 (international trading) visas will be issued for foreigners that invested more than 100 million won ($91,000) into Korea as long as they have a master's or higher degree from here.

Degree-seeking students in their master's or doctor's program are now allowed to bring two of their immediate family members or spouse to Korea after the first six months.

The number of foreign students in Korea has increased to 86,410 in 2014, a 6.7 percent increase from 80,985 in 2009.

"We expect more foreign talent to help boost the economy," a ministry official said.

As part of its efforts to tackle the nation's declining labor force, the ministry is expected to continue to open more doors for foreign talent.

In December, the government said it also plans to relax the current points-based system to give permanent residency to more talented foreign workers.

As the nation's birth rate remains stubbornly low at 1.19 children per woman, many concerns have been raised that it could seriously erode the national economy's growth potential. The rate is one of the lowest in the world, along with Hong Kong, Taiwan, Macau and Singapore.

The government believes that the working age population is 73 percent of the nation's total this year ― the highest rate ever, but it is expected to decrease from 2017.

If the government's efforts to boost the birth rate continue to be futile, many experts say that the only other way to keep the country afloat is attracting more foreign talent.



Korean Language

국내 대학 졸업 외국인 취업비자 요건 완화

영주 자격 중 첨단기술분야 전공 요건은 이공계로 확대

외국인의 국내 창업과 취업을 활성화하기 위해 국내 유학 중인 외국인의 취업비자와 영주권 취득 자격이 대폭 완화된다.

법무부는 지난해 12월 발표한 2015년 경제정책방향의 외국인력 유치 방안과 관련해 국내 대학 졸업 외국인의 취업비자(E-7), 영주자격 취득 요건을 완화하고 구직비자의 체류기간을 대폭 늘리는 조치를 10일부터 시행한다고 9일 밝혔다.

학사학위를 받더라도 취업직종과 전공과목의 관련성이 있어야 취업비자를 받을 수 있었던 규정은 폐지됐다.

평균학점 3.0 이상이거나 국가기술자격증을 소지해야 했던 전문학사 학위자의 취업비자 요건 중에서 학점과 자격증 부분을 폐지하고 전공 관련성을 폭넓게 인정하기로 했다.

1년으로 제한됐던 전문학사·학사 학위자의 구직비자 체류기간은 국가기술자격증 등 일정 요건을 갖추면 최대 2년까지 보장한다.

IT, 기술경영, 나노, 디지털전자, 바이오, 신소재 등 첨단기술분야의 학사학위 이상 취득자에 대해 국내에서 3년 체류하고 연간소득이 1인당 국민총소득(GNI) 이상일 때 부여했던 영주 자격 중 전공분야는 첨단기술에서 이공계로 확대된다.

석사 학위 이상 취득자는 전공분야 제한없이 영주 자격을 얻을 수 있다.

아울러 국내 대학에서 석사 이상 학위를 취득한 유학(D-2), 구직(D-10) 비자 자격자로 1억원 이상을 투자해 회사를 경영하거나 영리사업을 하려는 외국인은 무역경영(D-9) 비자를 받을 수 있다.

국내 대학의 석·박사과정에서 6개월 이상 유학하며 체류 중인 외국인 유학생은 자신과 배우자의 부모를 포함해 최대 2명까지 초청할 수 있는 규정도 신설됐다.

지난해 말 기준 국내 외국인 유학생은 8만6천410명으로 5년 전인 2009년 8만985명보다 6.7% 증가했다. (연합뉴스)



By Jung Min-ho

The Ministry of Justice eased visa restrictions Tuesday for foreigners with a Korean college degree in an effort to keep more international talent in the country.

The policy change will enable foreigners who have earned bachelor's or higher degrees in Korea to get an E-7 (designated activities) visa, even if what they do in the workplace is unrelated to their major. Previously, that relevancy was required.

A GPA of at least 3.0, a national certificate and recommendations of professors are no longer required from foreigners to apply for a D-10 (job seeking) visa.

Also, the length of stay for D-10 visa holders has been extended from one to two years.

Meanwhile, obtaining permanent residency in Korea has become easier.

Foreigners who received their bachelor's degree in science or engineering in Korea are now eligible to get permanent residency if they lived here for more than three years and their annual salary is higher than Korea's per capita gross national income (GNI). In 2013, that was $26,205.

Previously, the opportunity for permanent residency was limited to foreigners that studied one of only nine programs in college ― IT, technology management, nanotechnology, digital electronics, biotechnology, transport, new material, environment and energy.

Those who earned their master's or a higher degree in Korea are eligible to get permanent residency regardless of their majors, if they lived in Korea more than three years and their annual salary is higher than the GNI per capita.

The D-9 (international trading) visas will be issued for foreigners that invested more than 100 million won ($91,000) into Korea as long as they have a master's or higher degree from here.

Degree-seeking students in their master's or doctor's program are now allowed to bring two of their immediate family members or spouse to Korea after the first six months.

The number of foreign students in Korea has increased to 86,410 in 2014, a 6.7 percent increase from 80,985 in 2009.

"We expect more foreign talent to help boost the economy," a ministry official said.

As part of its efforts to tackle the nation's declining labor force, the ministry is expected to continue to open more doors for foreign talent.

In December, the government said it also plans to relax the current points-based system to give permanent residency to more talented foreign workers.

As the nation's birth rate remains stubbornly low at 1.19 children per woman, many concerns have been raised that it could seriously erode the national economy's growth potential. The rate is one of the lowest in the world, along with Hong Kong, Taiwan, Macau and Singapore.

The government believes that the working age population is 73 percent of the nation's total this year ― the highest rate ever, but it is expected to decrease from 2017.

If the government's efforts to boost the birth rate continue to be futile, many experts say that the only other way to keep the country afloat is attracting more foreign talent.


dailyenglish
dailyenglish

X
CLOSE

Top 10 Stories

go top LETTER

The Korea Times

Sign up for eNewsletter