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US experts call on Japan to renounce Dokdo

By Kim Hyo-jin

U.S. experts urged Japan, Monday, to end its territorial claims on the islet of Dokdo and compensate victims of wartime sexual slavery who suffered under Japanese Imperial rule during World War II, to improve icy Korea-Japan relations.

"We call upon Japan to give up its claims on Dokdo, and we call for payments from the Japanese government to comfort women," Brad Glosserman, executive director of the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) said during a seminar in Washington D.C. hosted by the Asan Institute. "On South Korea's part, it should formally accept the Japanese offers."

Glosserman and Scott Snyder, senior fellows for Korea studies at the Council on Foreign Relations presented ideas for creating a forward-looking relationship, naming them a "Grand Bargain" solution.

They further proposed a new Korea-Japan treaty of friendship, including a declaration that the two countries would never use force to settle any dispute.

The treaty should include Japan's declaration of its support for ROK-U.S. relations, and Korea's recognition of Japan's legitimate role in maintaining regional security, the experts said.

"What we suggest is true leadership," Snyder said, urging both countries' leaders to take the initiative amid stalled bilateral relations. "Leaders have the opportunity to decide whether to be national or truly historical figures by embracing a Grand Bargain."

"That takes a great deal of courage and blowback will be quite severe. Nevertheless, I remain optimistic," he added.

Snyder added that the U.S. can help create an enabling environment for the two countries to reconcile with each other, citing that this is also necessary for Washington to pursue "rebalancing to Asia."

"It is not possible to achieve this as long as Korea and Japan are at odds with each other," he said.

He mentioned the U.S. policymakers' difficulties in viewing Korea-Japan ties. "U.S. policymakers would stumble if they adopt a realist perspective to see their relations, believing countries simply work together against common threats," he said, citing the controversy sparked by recent remarks made by Under Secretary of State for the United States, Wendy Sherman.

Glosserman and Snyder, co-authors of the book "The Japan-South Korea Identity Clash," explained that ongoing disputes between Seoul and Tokyo came from clashes of identity, not from clashes of strategy.

Koreans have deep-rooted concerns toward Japan due to its colonial rule of the peninsula, while Japanese people find that they are victimized for the past Imperialism of their nation, they said.


By Kim Hyo-jin

U.S. experts urged Japan, Monday, to end its territorial claims on the islet of Dokdo and compensate victims of wartime sexual slavery who suffered under Japanese Imperial rule during World War II, to improve icy Korea-Japan relations.

"We call upon Japan to give up its claims on Dokdo, and we call for payments from the Japanese government to comfort women," Brad Glosserman, executive director of the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) said during a seminar in Washington D.C. hosted by the Asan Institute. "On South Korea's part, it should formally accept the Japanese offers."

Glosserman and Scott Snyder, senior fellows for Korea studies at the Council on Foreign Relations presented ideas for creating a forward-looking relationship, naming them a "Grand Bargain" solution.

They further proposed a new Korea-Japan treaty of friendship, including a declaration that the two countries would never use force to settle any dispute.

The treaty should include Japan's declaration of its support for ROK-U.S. relations, and Korea's recognition of Japan's legitimate role in maintaining regional security, the experts said.

"What we suggest is true leadership," Snyder said, urging both countries' leaders to take the initiative amid stalled bilateral relations. "Leaders have the opportunity to decide whether to be national or truly historical figures by embracing a Grand Bargain."

"That takes a great deal of courage and blowback will be quite severe. Nevertheless, I remain optimistic," he added.

Snyder added that the U.S. can help create an enabling environment for the two countries to reconcile with each other, citing that this is also necessary for Washington to pursue "rebalancing to Asia."

"It is not possible to achieve this as long as Korea and Japan are at odds with each other," he said.

He mentioned the U.S. policymakers' difficulties in viewing Korea-Japan ties. "U.S. policymakers would stumble if they adopt a realist perspective to see their relations, believing countries simply work together against common threats," he said, citing the controversy sparked by recent remarks made by Under Secretary of State for the United States, Wendy Sherman.

Glosserman and Snyder, co-authors of the book "The Japan-South Korea Identity Clash," explained that ongoing disputes between Seoul and Tokyo came from clashes of identity, not from clashes of strategy.

Koreans have deep-rooted concerns toward Japan due to its colonial rule of the peninsula, while Japanese people find that they are victimized for the past Imperialism of their nation, they said.


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