South Koreans hold anti-Abe rally

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South Koreans hold anti-Abe rally



Thousands of South Koreans took part in a candle-lit rally on Saturday (August 10) to protest against Japan's decision to impose restrictions on exports from its Asian neighbour.


Protesters holding candles and placards reading "No Abe" gathered next to a "comfort women" statue near the Japanese embassy in Seoul. The statue commemorates Korean women forced to work in Japanese military brothels during World War Two.

Earlier in the day, South Korean activists launched what they termed "No Abe Street"; hanging three hundred placards reading "No Abe" on the trees along a Seoul street near Seodaemun Prison where independent activists were jailed during the Japan's colonial rule.

Protesters shout slogans as they hold signs and candles during a rally denouncing Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and also demanding the South Korean government to abolish the General Security of Military Information Agreement, or GSOMIA, an intelligence-sharing agreement between South Korea and Japan, near the Japanese embassy in Seoul, South Korea, Saturday, Aug. 10, 2019. The letters read 'No Abe.' AP

Japan cited security concerns for the trade measures. The move, however, has also been seen as retaliation after a South Korean court last year ordered Japanese companies to compensate Koreans who were forced to work for Japanese occupiers during World War Two. Japan has also removed South Korea from a list of favored trading partners. (Reuters)





Thousands of South Koreans took part in a candle-lit rally on Saturday (August 10) to protest against Japan's decision to impose restrictions on exports from its Asian neighbour.


Protesters holding candles and placards reading "No Abe" gathered next to a "comfort women" statue near the Japanese embassy in Seoul. The statue commemorates Korean women forced to work in Japanese military brothels during World War Two.

Earlier in the day, South Korean activists launched what they termed "No Abe Street"; hanging three hundred placards reading "No Abe" on the trees along a Seoul street near Seodaemun Prison where independent activists were jailed during the Japan's colonial rule.

Protesters shout slogans as they hold signs and candles during a rally denouncing Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and also demanding the South Korean government to abolish the General Security of Military Information Agreement, or GSOMIA, an intelligence-sharing agreement between South Korea and Japan, near the Japanese embassy in Seoul, South Korea, Saturday, Aug. 10, 2019. The letters read 'No Abe.' AP

Japan cited security concerns for the trade measures. The move, however, has also been seen as retaliation after a South Korean court last year ordered Japanese companies to compensate Koreans who were forced to work for Japanese occupiers during World War Two. Japan has also removed South Korea from a list of favored trading partners. (Reuters)



Choi Won-suk wschoi@koreatimes.co.kr


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