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2022 Pulitzer Prize: Bearing witness to history

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This photo by Los Angeles Times correspondent and photographer Marcus Yam, provided by Columbia University, shows a military transport plane flying over relatives and neighbors of the Ahmadi family, as they gather around an incinerated vehicle destroyed by a U.S. drone strike in Kabul, Afghanistan, Aug. 30, 2021. Yam was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Photography for work related to the fall of Kabul, in New York, Monday, May 9, 2022. (Marcus Yam/Los Angeles Times via AP)
This photo by Los Angeles Times correspondent and photographer Marcus Yam, provided by Columbia University, shows a military transport plane flying over relatives and neighbors of the Ahmadi family, as they gather around an incinerated vehicle destroyed by a U.S. drone strike in Kabul, Afghanistan, Aug. 30, 2021. Yam was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Photography for work related to the fall of Kabul, in New York, Monday, May 9, 2022. (Marcus Yam/Los Angeles Times via AP)
Taliban fighters pray next to young Afghans outside a local mosque for evening prayers in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Aug. 26, 2021. In its nearly two-decade fight with the U.S., the Taliban worked at every turn to undermine the Afghan government, deriding its leaders as corrupt stooges whose forces could never protect citizens from the group's ferocious attacks. But the Taliban is now in charge, and with power comes a daunting challenge: convincing Afghans - many of them with bitter memories of the last time the fundamentalist group ran the country - that it can govern and police as well as it can fight.  EPA/Marcus Yam
Taliban fighters pray next to young Afghans outside a local mosque for evening prayers in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Aug. 26, 2021. In its nearly two-decade fight with the U.S., the Taliban worked at every turn to undermine the Afghan government, deriding its leaders as corrupt stooges whose forces could never protect citizens from the group's ferocious attacks. But the Taliban is now in charge, and with power comes a daunting challenge: convincing Afghans - many of them with bitter memories of the last time the fundamentalist group ran the country - that it can govern and police as well as it can fight. EPA/Marcus Yam
Women and children crouch in the sweltering heat at a Taliban-controlled checkpoint near Abbey Gate, an entrance to the Kabul airport on Aug. 25, 2021. They wait to make their way towards the British military-controlled entrance of the airport. Outside the gates, the bit of U.S.-held territory remaining in the country, bedlam became a daily event. Even those with permission to leave faced crushing crowds and uneasy Taliban fighters using truncheons, sticks, whips, rifle butts and bullets to disperse people around the airport's environs.  EPA/Marcus Yam
Women and children crouch in the sweltering heat at a Taliban-controlled checkpoint near Abbey Gate, an entrance to the Kabul airport on Aug. 25, 2021. They wait to make their way towards the British military-controlled entrance of the airport. Outside the gates, the bit of U.S.-held territory remaining in the country, bedlam became a daily event. Even those with permission to leave faced crushing crowds and uneasy Taliban fighters using truncheons, sticks, whips, rifle butts and bullets to disperse people around the airport's environs. EPA/Marcus Yam
Anti-Taliban protesters mark Afghanistan's independence day by attempting to hoist the red, green and black national banner. They were often beaten by militant fighters, who newly controlled the streets of Kabul. About 200 people rallied towards the city center on Aug. 19, 2021, chanting 'Death to Pakistan, God Bless Afghanistan, Long Live the National Flag of Afghanistan.'  EPA/Marcus Yam
Anti-Taliban protesters mark Afghanistan's independence day by attempting to hoist the red, green and black national banner. They were often beaten by militant fighters, who newly controlled the streets of Kabul. About 200 people rallied towards the city center on Aug. 19, 2021, chanting 'Death to Pakistan, God Bless Afghanistan, Long Live the National Flag of Afghanistan.' EPA/Marcus Yam
A wounded patient lies in the recovery unit at Wazir Akbar Khan Hospital in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Aug. 26, 2021. A suicide bomber from the terrorist group ISIS-K struck Kabul airport's Abbey Gate entrance. The blast ripped through crowds of Afghans and foreign nationals. At least 170 civilians were killed in addition to 13 U.S. service personnel, and at least 200 people were wounded. The explosions complicated an already nightmarish airlift just before the U.S. deadline to remove its troops from the country.  EPA/Marcus Yam
A wounded patient lies in the recovery unit at Wazir Akbar Khan Hospital in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Aug. 26, 2021. A suicide bomber from the terrorist group ISIS-K struck Kabul airport's Abbey Gate entrance. The blast ripped through crowds of Afghans and foreign nationals. At least 170 civilians were killed in addition to 13 U.S. service personnel, and at least 200 people were wounded. The explosions complicated an already nightmarish airlift just before the U.S. deadline to remove its troops from the country. EPA/Marcus Yam
Former Kabul Mayor Mohammad Daoud Sultanzoy, left, meets with new interim Mayor Hamdullah Namony at the Kabul Municipality office in Afghanistan on Aug. 28, 2021. 'The leadership of the Taliban, most are of the age that - without mentioning to them - they feel the change in Kabul every day, because they were here when it was inhabited by less than 500,000 people,' said Daoud Sultanzoy, Kabul's 66-year-old mayor and one of the few top officials from the bygone state to remain in his post to ease the transition to interim Mayor Namony. He referred to the Taliban's first foray as rulers in 1996, when they entered a capital so destroyed by civil war that 'dogs eating corpses were roaming the streets. Now they came to a Kabul that was intact. With all of its flaws, it was a city that had life, that was functioning, it had services, markets, an economy - so they inherited a better Kabul than they had 25 years ago.'  EPA/Marcus Yam
Former Kabul Mayor Mohammad Daoud Sultanzoy, left, meets with new interim Mayor Hamdullah Namony at the Kabul Municipality office in Afghanistan on Aug. 28, 2021. 'The leadership of the Taliban, most are of the age that - without mentioning to them - they feel the change in Kabul every day, because they were here when it was inhabited by less than 500,000 people,' said Daoud Sultanzoy, Kabul's 66-year-old mayor and one of the few top officials from the bygone state to remain in his post to ease the transition to interim Mayor Namony. He referred to the Taliban's first foray as rulers in 1996, when they entered a capital so destroyed by civil war that 'dogs eating corpses were roaming the streets. Now they came to a Kabul that was intact. With all of its flaws, it was a city that had life, that was functioning, it had services, markets, an economy - so they inherited a better Kabul than they had 25 years ago.' EPA/Marcus Yam
Minibus passengers look on as Taliban soldiers patrol a busy street in downtown Kabul on Aug. 26, 2021. Taliban fighters are the enforcers of Afghanistan's new law and order - young men eager to escape the mundane business of governing and policing, who are used to the intensity of battle but also the simplicity of life in the rural provinces.  EPA/Marcus Yam
Minibus passengers look on as Taliban soldiers patrol a busy street in downtown Kabul on Aug. 26, 2021. Taliban fighters are the enforcers of Afghanistan's new law and order - young men eager to escape the mundane business of governing and policing, who are used to the intensity of battle but also the simplicity of life in the rural provinces. EPA/Marcus Yam
Family members and neighbors of the Ahmadi family gather to examine the wreckage caused by a hellfire missile launched from a U.S. drone that targeted a vehicle parked inside a residential compound in the Khwaja Burgha neighborhood in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Aug. 30, 2021. The U.S. military says that the air strike was meant to target ISIS-K militants and retaliate for an airport bombing carried out by the terror group. Instead, it took the lives of 10 civilians â€
Family members and neighbors of the Ahmadi family gather to examine the wreckage caused by a hellfire missile launched from a U.S. drone that targeted a vehicle parked inside a residential compound in the Khwaja Burgha neighborhood in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Aug. 30, 2021. The U.S. military says that the air strike was meant to target ISIS-K militants and retaliate for an airport bombing carried out by the terror group. Instead, it took the lives of 10 civilians â€" members of Emal Ahmadi’s family, including seven children. The U.S. would eventually call the strike a 'tragic mistake.' EPA/Marcus Yam
A military transport plane departs overhead as Afghans hoping to leave the country wait outside the Kabul airport on Aug. 23, 2021. Since the Taliban takeover of Afghanistan earlier in August, more than 120,000 people were airlifted out of Afghanistan in one of the largest mass evacuations in U.S. history.  EPA/Marcus Yam
A military transport plane departs overhead as Afghans hoping to leave the country wait outside the Kabul airport on Aug. 23, 2021. Since the Taliban takeover of Afghanistan earlier in August, more than 120,000 people were airlifted out of Afghanistan in one of the largest mass evacuations in U.S. history. EPA/Marcus Yam
Mourners at a mass funeral look up and weep as the roar of jet engines drown out their wails in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Aug. 30, 2021. Fighter jets circled the hilltop cemetery where members of the Ahmadi family were burying 10 of their own - seven of them children - all victims of a U.S. drone strike. A full day before the U.S. military withdrawal approached its conclusion, death continued to haunt the war-torn country. The airstrike came in the wake of an airport bombing on Aug. 26 carried out by ISIS-K militants. The United States military claimed initially that it was targeting an alleged Islamic extremist who posed the threat of carrying out a similar attack. A month later, it reversed its position, but the Pentagon decided no American troops would be punished. Left to grieve and wonder, Emal Ahmadi could not understand how it could be that a family could die and no one be held accountable.  EPA/Marcus Yam
Mourners at a mass funeral look up and weep as the roar of jet engines drown out their wails in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Aug. 30, 2021. Fighter jets circled the hilltop cemetery where members of the Ahmadi family were burying 10 of their own - seven of them children - all victims of a U.S. drone strike. A full day before the U.S. military withdrawal approached its conclusion, death continued to haunt the war-torn country. The airstrike came in the wake of an airport bombing on Aug. 26 carried out by ISIS-K militants. The United States military claimed initially that it was targeting an alleged Islamic extremist who posed the threat of carrying out a similar attack. A month later, it reversed its position, but the Pentagon decided no American troops would be punished. Left to grieve and wonder, Emal Ahmadi could not understand how it could be that a family could die and no one be held accountable. EPA/Marcus Yam
Visiting for the first time since the Taliban took over the country, Laila Haidari weeps as she surveys the dismantling of what had been a 'sacred place' for her - Taj Begum, a shabby-chic Puli Surkh neighborhood in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Sept. 20, 2021. But fearing the Taliban's wrath, Haidari shut down her cafe in August. The cafe, a fulcrum of Kabul's cultural life, is a casualty of the new order ushered in by the Taliban. 'It was where women, with all their wounds, could come and speak with us, and speak with each other. It gave people their lives back; it touched so many people,' said Haidari, her voice holding back sobs. 'Taj Begum wasn't just a restaurant or a business to me. It was like a cinema, a theater, a place where men and women could sing together.'  EPA/Marcus Yam
Visiting for the first time since the Taliban took over the country, Laila Haidari weeps as she surveys the dismantling of what had been a 'sacred place' for her - Taj Begum, a shabby-chic Puli Surkh neighborhood in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Sept. 20, 2021. But fearing the Taliban's wrath, Haidari shut down her cafe in August. The cafe, a fulcrum of Kabul's cultural life, is a casualty of the new order ushered in by the Taliban. 'It was where women, with all their wounds, could come and speak with us, and speak with each other. It gave people their lives back; it touched so many people,' said Haidari, her voice holding back sobs. 'Taj Begum wasn't just a restaurant or a business to me. It was like a cinema, a theater, a place where men and women could sing together.' EPA/Marcus Yam
Afghans clamor to greet Khalil Rahman Haqqani, a senior member of the Haqqani network after he delivered a sermon for the first Friday prayers under Taliban rule at the Pul-i-Khishti Mosque in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Aug. 20, 2021. The Haqqani network is a Taliban splinter group considered a terrorist organization by the United States and is one of the fiercest foes American forces spent two decades trying to vanquish in Afghanistan. Flanked by armed guards, Haqqani cradled a rifle: an American-made M-4 carbine. From the pulpit, he delivered a message that was by turns reassuring and menacing: Life under the Taliban would be different than under the deposed national rulers he derided as weak and corrupt. 'We have freed Afghanistan from Western imperialism and the infidels. Afghanistan will now be a peaceful and prosperous country, where there will be security, no corruption, and no theft,' he said. All of the country's various ethnicities and factions, he added, were 'brothers.'  EPA/Marcus Yam
Afghans clamor to greet Khalil Rahman Haqqani, a senior member of the Haqqani network after he delivered a sermon for the first Friday prayers under Taliban rule at the Pul-i-Khishti Mosque in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Aug. 20, 2021. The Haqqani network is a Taliban splinter group considered a terrorist organization by the United States and is one of the fiercest foes American forces spent two decades trying to vanquish in Afghanistan. Flanked by armed guards, Haqqani cradled a rifle: an American-made M-4 carbine. From the pulpit, he delivered a message that was by turns reassuring and menacing: Life under the Taliban would be different than under the deposed national rulers he derided as weak and corrupt. 'We have freed Afghanistan from Western imperialism and the infidels. Afghanistan will now be a peaceful and prosperous country, where there will be security, no corruption, and no theft,' he said. All of the country's various ethnicities and factions, he added, were 'brothers.' EPA/Marcus Yam
After the stroke of midnight, Taliban fighters from the Fateh Zwak unit storm into Hamid Karzai International Airport, while wearing American-made uniforms and brandishing American M4 and M16 rifles and riding U.S. pickup trucks on Aug. 31, 2021. For two weeks, Kabul's airport was the last tether to America's control in Afghanistan, its runways the site of a frantic airlift that spirited more than 120,000 people out of the country. But there was no more of that frenzied activity on the deadline of the U.S. withdrawal, hours after the last U.S. military transport plane rumbled into the night sky, closing the chapter on a 20-year U.S. intervention that ended the way it began: with the Taliban in control of Afghanistan.  EPA/Marcus Yam
After the stroke of midnight, Taliban fighters from the Fateh Zwak unit storm into Hamid Karzai International Airport, while wearing American-made uniforms and brandishing American M4 and M16 rifles and riding U.S. pickup trucks on Aug. 31, 2021. For two weeks, Kabul's airport was the last tether to America's control in Afghanistan, its runways the site of a frantic airlift that spirited more than 120,000 people out of the country. But there was no more of that frenzied activity on the deadline of the U.S. withdrawal, hours after the last U.S. military transport plane rumbled into the night sky, closing the chapter on a 20-year U.S. intervention that ended the way it began: with the Taliban in control of Afghanistan. EPA/Marcus Yam
Journalists from the Etilaat Roz newspaper, Nemat Naqdi, 28, left and Taqi Daryabi, 22, undress to show their wounds caused by beatings from Taliban fighters in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Sept. 8, 2021. The two were tortured while in custody after being arrested for filming a rally for women's rights. The demonstrations came just one day after the Taliban revealed an all-male interim government made up of stalwarts with zero representation for women or ethnic minority groups - their promise of a more tolerant rule clearly broken. 'They didn't let me resist,' Daryabi said of the brutality he and his colleague suffered. He said he was shoved to the ground, tortured and beaten unconscious. He was taken to a yard and water was poured on him. He was still there when they brought Naqdi. 'We were shouting that we are journalists. But they didn't care,' Naqdi said. 'I thought they were going to kill me‚They kept on ridiculing us, asking if we were filming them.'  EPA/Marcus Yam
Journalists from the Etilaat Roz newspaper, Nemat Naqdi, 28, left and Taqi Daryabi, 22, undress to show their wounds caused by beatings from Taliban fighters in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Sept. 8, 2021. The two were tortured while in custody after being arrested for filming a rally for women's rights. The demonstrations came just one day after the Taliban revealed an all-male interim government made up of stalwarts with zero representation for women or ethnic minority groups - their promise of a more tolerant rule clearly broken. 'They didn't let me resist,' Daryabi said of the brutality he and his colleague suffered. He said he was shoved to the ground, tortured and beaten unconscious. He was taken to a yard and water was poured on him. He was still there when they brought Naqdi. 'We were shouting that we are journalists. But they didn't care,' Naqdi said. 'I thought they were going to kill me‚They kept on ridiculing us, asking if we were filming them.' EPA/Marcus Yam
A group of volunteer divers, assisted by the Coastal Resources Research Center and Royal Thai Navy, lift abandoned fishing nets covering coral reefs in a protected area of Ko Losin, Thailand on June 19, 2021. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (Pulitzer Prize finalist for Feature Photography)
A group of volunteer divers, assisted by the Coastal Resources Research Center and Royal Thai Navy, lift abandoned fishing nets covering coral reefs in a protected area of Ko Losin, Thailand on June 19, 2021. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (Pulitzer Prize finalist for Feature Photography)
<span>A woman prays on the banks of the polluted river Yamuna on a smoggy morning in New Delhi, November 8, 2021. REUTERS/Anushree Fadnavis (Pulitzer Prize finalist for Feature Photography)</span><br /><br />
A woman prays on the banks of the polluted river Yamuna on a smoggy morning in New Delhi, November 8, 2021. REUTERS/Anushree Fadnavis (Pulitzer Prize finalist for Feature Photography)
<span>A general view can be seen from a damaged movie theater after a devastating tornado ripped through Mayfield, Kentucky, U.S. on December 16, 2021. REUTERS/Cheney Orr (Pulitzer Prize finalist for Feature Photography)</span><br /><br />
A general view can be seen from a damaged movie theater after a devastating tornado ripped through Mayfield, Kentucky, U.S. on December 16, 2021. REUTERS/Cheney Orr (Pulitzer Prize finalist for Feature Photography)
Vitoria Rocha, 81, holds a picture of her parents, which she found in the rubble of her residence of nearly 40 years, after it was destroyed by floods, in Itambe, State of Bahia, Brazil on December 28, 2021. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli (Pulitzer Prize finalist for Feature Photography)
Vitoria Rocha, 81, holds a picture of her parents, which she found in the rubble of her residence of nearly 40 years, after it was destroyed by floods, in Itambe, State of Bahia, Brazil on December 28, 2021. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli (Pulitzer Prize finalist for Feature Photography)
Firefighters spray water from a fire train, designed to fight wildfires, on hot spots along the tracks over Rock Creek Bridge as the Dixie Fire grows in Plumas National Forest, California, U.S., July 15, 2021.  REUTERS/David Swanson (Pulitzer Prize finalist for Feature Photography)
Firefighters spray water from a fire train, designed to fight wildfires, on hot spots along the tracks over Rock Creek Bridge as the Dixie Fire grows in Plumas National Forest, California, U.S., July 15, 2021. REUTERS/David Swanson (Pulitzer Prize finalist for Feature Photography)
A home is reflected in floodwaters in the Yarrow neighbourhood after rainstorms caused flooding and landslides in Chilliwack, British Columbia, Canada November 20, 2021. REUTERS/Jesse Winter (Pulitzer Prize finalist for Feature Photography)
A home is reflected in floodwaters in the Yarrow neighbourhood after rainstorms caused flooding and landslides in Chilliwack, British Columbia, Canada November 20, 2021. REUTERS/Jesse Winter (Pulitzer Prize finalist for Feature Photography)
The melting Sermeq glacier, located around 80 km south of Nuuk, is photographed in this aerial over Greenland, September 11, 2021. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke (Pulitzer Prize finalist for Feature Photography)
The melting Sermeq glacier, located around 80 km south of Nuuk, is photographed in this aerial over Greenland, September 11, 2021. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke (Pulitzer Prize finalist for Feature Photography)
A polar bear rests after sparring with another bear near the Hudson Bay community of Churchill, Manitoba, Canada November 20, 2021. REUTERS/Carlos Osorio (Pulitzer Prize finalist for Feature Photography)
A polar bear rests after sparring with another bear near the Hudson Bay community of Churchill, Manitoba, Canada November 20, 2021. REUTERS/Carlos Osorio (Pulitzer Prize finalist for Feature Photography)
Lava is seen through the window of a kitchen from El Paso following the eruption of a volcano on the Canary Island of La Palma, Spain, September 28, 2021. REUTERS/Jon Nazca (Pulitzer Prize finalist for Feature Photography)
Lava is seen through the window of a kitchen from El Paso following the eruption of a volcano on the Canary Island of La Palma, Spain, September 28, 2021. REUTERS/Jon Nazca (Pulitzer Prize finalist for Feature Photography)
Fishermen bring in their catch from a lake in front of a power plant of the State Development and Investment Corporation outside Tianjin, China, October 14, 2021. REUTERS/Thomas Peter (Pulitzer Prize finalist for Feature Photography)
Fishermen bring in their catch from a lake in front of a power plant of the State Development and Investment Corporation outside Tianjin, China, October 14, 2021. REUTERS/Thomas Peter (Pulitzer Prize finalist for Feature Photography)
Sea-surface-cleaning vessels and barrier-laying boats clean up sea snot, a thick slimy layer of the organic matter also known as marine mucilage, which spread through the Sea of Marmara threatening marine life and the fishing industry, in Istanbul, Turkey June 15, 2021. REUTERS/Umit Bektas (Pulitzer Prize finalist for Feature Photography)
Sea-surface-cleaning vessels and barrier-laying boats clean up sea snot, a thick slimy layer of the organic matter also known as marine mucilage, which spread through the Sea of Marmara threatening marine life and the fishing industry, in Istanbul, Turkey June 15, 2021. REUTERS/Umit Bektas (Pulitzer Prize finalist for Feature Photography)
A woman carrying a child and belongings wades through floodwaters following heavy rainfall in Zhengzhou, Henan province, China July 23, 2021. REUTERS/Aly Song (Pulitzer Prize finalist for Feature Photography)
A woman carrying a child and belongings wades through floodwaters following heavy rainfall in Zhengzhou, Henan province, China July 23, 2021. REUTERS/Aly Song (Pulitzer Prize finalist for Feature Photography)
A man engulfed by a swarm of desert locusts stands on top of a hill near Nanyuki, Kenya, January 30, 2021. REUTERS/Baz Ratner (Pulitzer Prize finalist for Feature Photography)
A man engulfed by a swarm of desert locusts stands on top of a hill near Nanyuki, Kenya, January 30, 2021. REUTERS/Baz Ratner (Pulitzer Prize finalist for Feature Photography)
A man watches the body of a dead humpback whale, measuring 15.70 meters long according to El Salvador's Ministry of Environment, after it washed ashore in Las Flores beach in La Libertad, El Salvador November 5, 2021. REUTERS/Jose Cabezas  (Pulitzer Prize finalist for Feature Photography)
A man watches the body of a dead humpback whale, measuring 15.70 meters long according to El Salvador's Ministry of Environment, after it washed ashore in Las Flores beach in La Libertad, El Salvador November 5, 2021. REUTERS/Jose Cabezas (Pulitzer Prize finalist for Feature Photography)
Theophilus Charles, 70, sits inside his house which was heavily damaged by Hurricane Ida in Houma, Louisiana, U.S., August 30, 2021. REUTERS/Adrees Latif (Pulitzer Prize finalist for Feature Photography)
Theophilus Charles, 70, sits inside his house which was heavily damaged by Hurricane Ida in Houma, Louisiana, U.S., August 30, 2021. REUTERS/Adrees Latif (Pulitzer Prize finalist for Feature Photography)
<span>A man sits next to his wife, who was suffering from a high fever, as she intravenously receives rehydration fluid at a makeshift clinic during a surge of the coronavirus disease in Parsaul village located in the northern state of Uttar Pradesh, India, May 22, 2021. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi. (Pulitzer Prize Winner for Feature Photography)</span><br /><br />
A man sits next to his wife, who was suffering from a high fever, as she intravenously receives rehydration fluid at a makeshift clinic during a surge of the coronavirus disease in Parsaul village located in the northern state of Uttar Pradesh, India, May 22, 2021. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi. (Pulitzer Prize Winner for Feature Photography)
<span>A healthcare worker administers a dose of CoviShield, a coronavirus disease vaccine, to a shepherd man during a vaccination drive in Lidderwat, located in India Kashmir's Anantnag district, June 10, 2021. REUTERS/Sanna Irshad Mattoo (Pulitzer Prize Winner for Feature Photography)</span><br /><br />
A healthcare worker administers a dose of CoviShield, a coronavirus disease vaccine, to a shepherd man during a vaccination drive in Lidderwat, located in India Kashmir's Anantnag district, June 10, 2021. REUTERS/Sanna Irshad Mattoo (Pulitzer Prize Winner for Feature Photography)
<span>A healthcare worker checks the temperature of a woman inside her hut during a coronavirus disease vaccination drive for workers at a brick kiln in Kavitha village on the outskirts of Ahmedabad, India, April 8, 2021. REUTERS/Amit Dave (Pulitzer Prize Winner for Feature Photography)</span><br /><br />
A healthcare worker checks the temperature of a woman inside her hut during a coronavirus disease vaccination drive for workers at a brick kiln in Kavitha village on the outskirts of Ahmedabad, India, April 8, 2021. REUTERS/Amit Dave (Pulitzer Prize Winner for Feature Photography)
<span>Manoj Kumar waves a handkerchief from the back seat of his vehicle at his mother Vidhya Devi as she receives oxygen in the parking lot of a Gurudwara (Sikh temple) amidst the spread of the coronavirus disease in Ghaziabad, India, April 24, 2021. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui (Pulitzer Prize Winner for Feature Photography)</span><br /><br />
Manoj Kumar waves a handkerchief from the back seat of his vehicle at his mother Vidhya Devi as she receives oxygen in the parking lot of a Gurudwara (Sikh temple) amidst the spread of the coronavirus disease in Ghaziabad, India, April 24, 2021. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui (Pulitzer Prize Winner for Feature Photography)
<span>Manisha Bashu presses the chest of her father, who was having difficulty breathing, after he felt unconscious while receiving oxygen support at a Gurudwara (Sikh temple) amidst the spread of coronavirus disease in Ghaziabad, India, April 30, 2021. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi (Pulitzer Prize Winner for Feature Photography)</span><br /><br />
Manisha Bashu presses the chest of her father, who was having difficulty breathing, after he felt unconscious while receiving oxygen support at a Gurudwara (Sikh temple) amidst the spread of coronavirus disease in Ghaziabad, India, April 30, 2021. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi (Pulitzer Prize Winner for Feature Photography)
A man grieves as his family member is declared dead outside the coronavirus disease casualty ward at the Guru Teg Bahadur hospital in New Delhi, India, April 23, 2021. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui (Pulitzer Prize Winner for Feature Photography)
A man grieves as his family member is declared dead outside the coronavirus disease casualty ward at the Guru Teg Bahadur hospital in New Delhi, India, April 23, 2021. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui (Pulitzer Prize Winner for Feature Photography)
<span>Family members embrace while wearing personal protective equipment as they mourn a male relative, who died from the coronavirus disease, during his cremation ceremony in New Delhi, India April 21, 2021. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi (Pulitzer Prize Winner for Feature Photography)</span><br /><br />
Family members embrace while wearing personal protective equipment as they mourn a male relative, who died from the coronavirus disease, during his cremation ceremony in New Delhi, India April 21, 2021. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi (Pulitzer Prize Winner for Feature Photography)
A female patient suffering from the coronavirus disease is attended to by hospital staff inside the emergency ward of the Holy Family hospital in New Delhi, India, April 29, 2021. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui (Pulitzer Prize Winner for Feature Photography)
A female patient suffering from the coronavirus disease is attended to by hospital staff inside the emergency ward of the Holy Family hospital in New Delhi, India, April 29, 2021. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui (Pulitzer Prize Winner for Feature Photography)
<span>The body of a person, who died from the coronavirus disease, lies on a funeral pyre during a mass cremation at a crematorium in New Delhi, India May 1, 2021. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi (Pulitzer Prize Winner for Feature Photography)</span><br /><br />
The body of a person, who died from the coronavirus disease, lies on a funeral pyre during a mass cremation at a crematorium in New Delhi, India May 1, 2021. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi (Pulitzer Prize Winner for Feature Photography)
<span>Residences surround the grounds of a crematorium during a mass cremation for victims of the coronavirus disease in New Delhi, India, April 22, 2021. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui (Pulitzer Prize Winner for Feature Photography)</span><br /><br />
Residences surround the grounds of a crematorium during a mass cremation for victims of the coronavirus disease in New Delhi, India, April 22, 2021. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui (Pulitzer Prize Winner for Feature Photography)
<span>Ashish Kashyap and Naman Sharma, volunteers at a non-profit organization, carry a bag containing unclaimed ashes of victims who died from the coronavirus disease at a crematorium in New Delhi, India, May 9, 2021. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi (Pulitzer Prize Winner for Feature Photography)</span><br /><br />
Ashish Kashyap and Naman Sharma, volunteers at a non-profit organization, carry a bag containing unclaimed ashes of victims who died from the coronavirus disease at a crematorium in New Delhi, India, May 9, 2021. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi (Pulitzer Prize Winner for Feature Photography)
Pranav Mishra, 19, kneels toward the body of his mother Mamta Mishra, 45, who died from the coronavirus disease, ahead of her cremation, in New Delhi, India, May 4, 2021. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui (Pulitzer Prize Winner for Feature Photography)
Pranav Mishra, 19, kneels toward the body of his mother Mamta Mishra, 45, who died from the coronavirus disease, ahead of her cremation, in New Delhi, India, May 4, 2021. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui (Pulitzer Prize Winner for Feature Photography)
Urns containing ashes after final rites of people, including those who died from the coronavirus disease, await immersion due to a national lockdown, at a crematorium in New Delhi, India, May 6, 2021. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui (Pulitzer Prize Winner for Feature Photography)
Urns containing ashes after final rites of people, including those who died from the coronavirus disease, await immersion due to a national lockdown, at a crematorium in New Delhi, India, May 6, 2021. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui (Pulitzer Prize Winner for Feature Photography)


Choi Won-suk wschoi@koreatimes.co.kr


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