Effective leadership (part 2)

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Effective leadership (part 2)


By Kim Jong-nam

There are a few things that are necessary in order to create a culture of effective leadership development. First, effective leadership development culture works as a cradle for long-term talent development because it enables the long-term oriented development of leaders through a deep-dive study of what and how to develop both individually and collectively.

Second, it is closely aligned with the strategy and the mission of a corporation, which leaders should always be aware of. Third, it becomes a mirror through which leaders can reflect and reestablish their leadership through self-awareness. Four, it is not ephemeral but long-term, because it is an on-going development which becomes possible through coaching, timely diagnoses, and constant feedback. Five, facilitators play a significant role by voicing their opinions on the program seriously and helping their participants with their individual development.

Many leadership training programs fall far short of this. First, facilitators tend to be evaluated based on the level of satisfaction of the participants rather whether they have truly developed their participants for the long term.

Facilitators who want merely to please their participants so that they will receive a positive evaluation will not end up getting them to do any hard work; it is much easier to entertain a group than to get it to dig deep. Second, training managers and chief executives usually pick topics that they think should be dealt with to resolve current organizational issues, rather than topics that will develop organizational leaders.

This results in an organization's strategy not being mirrored in the leadership development program. Third, these programs often don't focus on diagnoses or achievement of ROI as much as they ought to. Without an effective start and finish to the program, development cannot flourish.

Given this, I am delighted to be writing feedback for a workshop that has already finished and thinking about how to further develop the leadership of my program participants. I cannot overemphasize the correlation between a corporation's leadership and its competitiveness. If the former is weak, the latter will also be weak. Recently, many Korean corporations are attempting to change their corporate cultures; it is a big fad these days. However, without weighty considerations on how to change their leadership, these corporations will be unable to allow their new cultures to settle in.


Kim Jong-nam is the founding CEO of META (www.imeta.co.kr) and the author of two books, Organizations without Meetings and Breaking the Silent Rules.




By Kim Jong-nam

There are a few things that are necessary in order to create a culture of effective leadership development. First, effective leadership development culture works as a cradle for long-term talent development because it enables the long-term oriented development of leaders through a deep-dive study of what and how to develop both individually and collectively.

Second, it is closely aligned with the strategy and the mission of a corporation, which leaders should always be aware of. Third, it becomes a mirror through which leaders can reflect and reestablish their leadership through self-awareness. Four, it is not ephemeral but long-term, because it is an on-going development which becomes possible through coaching, timely diagnoses, and constant feedback. Five, facilitators play a significant role by voicing their opinions on the program seriously and helping their participants with their individual development.

Many leadership training programs fall far short of this. First, facilitators tend to be evaluated based on the level of satisfaction of the participants rather whether they have truly developed their participants for the long term.

Facilitators who want merely to please their participants so that they will receive a positive evaluation will not end up getting them to do any hard work; it is much easier to entertain a group than to get it to dig deep. Second, training managers and chief executives usually pick topics that they think should be dealt with to resolve current organizational issues, rather than topics that will develop organizational leaders.

This results in an organization's strategy not being mirrored in the leadership development program. Third, these programs often don't focus on diagnoses or achievement of ROI as much as they ought to. Without an effective start and finish to the program, development cannot flourish.

Given this, I am delighted to be writing feedback for a workshop that has already finished and thinking about how to further develop the leadership of my program participants. I cannot overemphasize the correlation between a corporation's leadership and its competitiveness. If the former is weak, the latter will also be weak. Recently, many Korean corporations are attempting to change their corporate cultures; it is a big fad these days. However, without weighty considerations on how to change their leadership, these corporations will be unable to allow their new cultures to settle in.


Kim Jong-nam is the founding CEO of META (www.imeta.co.kr) and the author of two books, Organizations without Meetings and Breaking the Silent Rules.



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