Sex slave's body carried to Japanese embassy

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Sex slave's body carried to Japanese embassy

A woman who joined protesters near the hearse carrying the body of Kim Bok-dong, a sex slave for the Imperial Japanese Army during World War II, cries while listening to a eulogy in front of the old Japanese Embassy building in Jongno-gu, Seoul, Friday. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chul

A painting of the late Kim Bok-dong in a frame decorated with wreaths atop the hearse carrying the 94-year-old's body to the former Japanese embassy on Friday. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chul
The parade passes Seoul City Hall on the right, where a giant poster commemorating the late Kim is hung, as the hearse moves along Sejong-daero Road toward the old Japanese Embassy. Citing her words, 'My wish is for my next generations to live light-heartedly,' the city government says in the banner that 'Seoul accompanies the last footsteps of the late peace, human rights activist Kim Bok-dong.' Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk

A large painting of the late Kim Bok-dong hangs next to the Seoul City Hall. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chul

A hand-crafted badge commemorating the sex slaves who served the Imperial Japanese Army during the World War II is pinned to a scarf adorning the 'comfort woman' bronze statue in front of the old Japanese Embassy in Seoul. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun

The late Kim's portrait, followed by her body in the hearse and people who joined the parade commemorating the former sex slave, walk past the United States Embassy in Seoul next to the Gwanghwamun Square on their right. The parade left Seoul City Hall square on Friday morning and headed to the old Japanese Embassy 1.4 kilometers north. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk

About 1,000 protesters joined Friday morning's parade, some carrying pole banners with phrases lamenting Kim's death. The banners read 'I am the Kim Bok-dong' and 'I am the women's rights activist." Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk

People in the parade, including nuns, carry mock-up yellow butterflies, which symbolize the sex slavery victims who served the Imperial Japanese Army during World War II, stuck on metal rods as they head to the old Japanese Embassy on Friday. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk
Some protest banners highlighted Japan's Shinzo Abe administration's refusal to make a sincere apology to the sex slavery victims who served the Imperial Japanese Army during World War II. One banner, above, portrays the late Kim, who had been berating the Japanese government for 27 years for not apologizing to the victims and the Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe not responding to her demand. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk
One protest banner highlights how Kim persistently talked about being a sex slave for the Imperial Japanese Army during World War II and how Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe denies Japan's crimes. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chul
Another sex slavery victim, Lee Yong-soo, center, holds a poster with a photo of the late Kim and a phrase that reads 'University students are here for Kim Bok-dong to carry her will' and joins others in demanding that the Japanese government respond to Kim's death, after the parade arrived at the old Japanese Embassy in Seoul. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chul
A woman who joined protesters near the hearse carrying the body of Kim Bok-dong, a sex slave for the Imperial Japanese Army during World War II, cries while listening to a eulogy in front of the old Japanese Embassy building in Jongno-gu, Seoul, Friday. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chul

A painting of the late Kim Bok-dong in a frame decorated with wreaths atop the hearse carrying the 94-year-old's body to the former Japanese embassy on Friday. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chul
The parade passes Seoul City Hall on the right, where a giant poster commemorating the late Kim is hung, as the hearse moves along Sejong-daero Road toward the old Japanese Embassy. Citing her words, 'My wish is for my next generations to live light-heartedly,' the city government says in the banner that 'Seoul accompanies the last footsteps of the late peace, human rights activist Kim Bok-dong.' Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk

A large painting of the late Kim Bok-dong hangs next to the Seoul City Hall. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chul

A hand-crafted badge commemorating the sex slaves who served the Imperial Japanese Army during the World War II is pinned to a scarf adorning the 'comfort woman' bronze statue in front of the old Japanese Embassy in Seoul. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun

The late Kim's portrait, followed by her body in the hearse and people who joined the parade commemorating the former sex slave, walk past the United States Embassy in Seoul next to the Gwanghwamun Square on their right. The parade left Seoul City Hall square on Friday morning and headed to the old Japanese Embassy 1.4 kilometers north. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk

About 1,000 protesters joined Friday morning's parade, some carrying pole banners with phrases lamenting Kim's death. The banners read 'I am the Kim Bok-dong' and 'I am the women's rights activist." Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk

People in the parade, including nuns, carry mock-up yellow butterflies, which symbolize the sex slavery victims who served the Imperial Japanese Army during World War II, stuck on metal rods as they head to the old Japanese Embassy on Friday. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk
Some protest banners highlighted Japan's Shinzo Abe administration's refusal to make a sincere apology to the sex slavery victims who served the Imperial Japanese Army during World War II. One banner, above, portrays the late Kim, who had been berating the Japanese government for 27 years for not apologizing to the victims and the Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe not responding to her demand. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk
One protest banner highlights how Kim persistently talked about being a sex slave for the Imperial Japanese Army during World War II and how Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe denies Japan's crimes. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chul
Another sex slavery victim, Lee Yong-soo, center, holds a poster with a photo of the late Kim and a phrase that reads 'University students are here for Kim Bok-dong to carry her will' and joins others in demanding that the Japanese government respond to Kim's death, after the parade arrived at the old Japanese Embassy in Seoul. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chul
Ko Dong-hwan aoshima11@koreatimes.co.kr


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