Typhoon Jangmi barreling toward S. Korea [PHOTOS] - The Korea Times
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Typhoon Jangmi barreling toward S. Korea [PHOTOS]

Surging waves smash against the breakwater at a port on Jeju Island, Monday. Yonhap
Surging waves smash against the breakwater at a port on Jeju Island, Monday. Yonhap

Typhoon Jangmi, the season's fifth typhoon, moved closer to the country's southern resort island of Jeju on Monday while the country's first monsoon season to extend into mid-August in decades showed no signs of letting up.

Rain was forecast for all regions of the country as Jangmi was traveling northeastward at a speed of 38 kilometers per hour at seas some 210 kilometers southeast of Seogwipo in Jeju as of 7 a.m.

More than 40 millimeters of rain per hour was forecast for South Gyeongsang Province, and showers of around 15 millimeters were forecast for parts of the southern coastal areas and Jeju.

Boats shelter at a port in Busan, Monday, as typhoon Jangmi approaches. Yonhap
Boats shelter at a port in Busan, Monday, as typhoon Jangmi approaches. Yonhap

A fishing boat is lifted on to land at a port in Busan on Monday to shelter from typhoon Jangmi. Yonhap
A fishing boat is lifted on to land at a port in Busan on Monday to shelter from typhoon Jangmi. Yonhap

Precipitation on Monday and Tuesday was expected to reach 50-150 mm for Chungcheong provinces, the southern region and Jeju, while up to 250 mm of heavy rain was expected for the southern coastal regions, Jeju's mountains, as well as Mount Jiri.

Some 30-80 mm of rain was expected for Seoul and Gyeonggi Province, as well as Gangwon Province, over the two days, while strong wind was expected for most of the country.
The typhoon, which means "rose" in Korean, came as the country is going through an unusually long monsoon season this year.

This year's monsoon season, which began on June 24 in the central region, has shown no signs of letting up, and it is likely to end later than the Aug. 10 record in 1987.

The monsoon season is also expected to set a fresh record as the longest one after a 49-day record in 2013. The monsoon has continued for 47 days and is likely to exceed 50 days, as seasonal rain is forecast to extend to mid-August.

The seasonal rain, which has pounded the central region with heavy downpours in August, has left 42 people dead or missing and damaged 14,091 facilities. Nearly 7,000 have been displaced from their homes. (Yonhap)


Surging waves smash against the breakwater at a port on Jeju Island, Monday. Yonhap
Surging waves smash against the breakwater at a port on Jeju Island, Monday. Yonhap

Typhoon Jangmi, the season's fifth typhoon, moved closer to the country's southern resort island of Jeju on Monday while the country's first monsoon season to extend into mid-August in decades showed no signs of letting up.

Rain was forecast for all regions of the country as Jangmi was traveling northeastward at a speed of 38 kilometers per hour at seas some 210 kilometers southeast of Seogwipo in Jeju as of 7 a.m.

More than 40 millimeters of rain per hour was forecast for South Gyeongsang Province, and showers of around 15 millimeters were forecast for parts of the southern coastal areas and Jeju.

Boats shelter at a port in Busan, Monday, as typhoon Jangmi approaches. Yonhap
Boats shelter at a port in Busan, Monday, as typhoon Jangmi approaches. Yonhap

A fishing boat is lifted on to land at a port in Busan on Monday to shelter from typhoon Jangmi. Yonhap
A fishing boat is lifted on to land at a port in Busan on Monday to shelter from typhoon Jangmi. Yonhap

Precipitation on Monday and Tuesday was expected to reach 50-150 mm for Chungcheong provinces, the southern region and Jeju, while up to 250 mm of heavy rain was expected for the southern coastal regions, Jeju's mountains, as well as Mount Jiri.

Some 30-80 mm of rain was expected for Seoul and Gyeonggi Province, as well as Gangwon Province, over the two days, while strong wind was expected for most of the country.
The typhoon, which means "rose" in Korean, came as the country is going through an unusually long monsoon season this year.

This year's monsoon season, which began on June 24 in the central region, has shown no signs of letting up, and it is likely to end later than the Aug. 10 record in 1987.

The monsoon season is also expected to set a fresh record as the longest one after a 49-day record in 2013. The monsoon has continued for 47 days and is likely to exceed 50 days, as seasonal rain is forecast to extend to mid-August.

The seasonal rain, which has pounded the central region with heavy downpours in August, has left 42 people dead or missing and damaged 14,091 facilities. Nearly 7,000 have been displaced from their homes. (Yonhap)



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